An adult Prairie Lizard from Clark County. Image by Lisa Wehrly.
Image © Suzanne L. Collins, CNAH.
An adult from Seward County. Image © Ryan Shofner.
An adult Prairie Lizard from Cherokee County, Kansas. Image by Jennifer Rader (iNat user: seknaturalist; obs: #92961421).
A springtime adult male Prairie Lizard from Comanche County. © Travis W. Taggart.
An adult Prairie Lizard from Logan County, Kansas. Image by Crystal Alexander (iNat #34566133).
An adult Prairie Lizard from Scott County, Kansas. Image by Mike Hudson (iNat #752103).
REPTILIA (Reptiles) SQUAMATA (PART) (Other Lizards) PHRYNOSOMATIDAE (Sand and Spiny Lizards)

Prairie Lizard
Sceloporus consobrinus Baird & Girard 1853
skē-lŏp-ŏr-ŭs — kŏn-sō-brī-nŭs


Conservation Status:

State: None

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S5 - Secure
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None
Diagnosis:
The Prairie Lizard is characterized by four limbs, an ear opening on each side of the head, rough, raised scales on its body, and a lack of horns sticking out of the back of its head. The head, body, limbs, and tail vary from gray to brown, with a pattern of narrow, dark irregular crossbands, dark spots, or dark and light stripes on the back. The belly and throat are gray-white, sometimes with bright bluish green or blue patches on each side. These patches are more brilliant in males and indistinct or absent in females. Females grow larger than males.
Two geographically distinct color patterns occur in Kansas.
Those populations in southeast Kansas (Cross Timbers of Chautauqua and Montgomery counties), Ozark Plateau (Cherokee County), and an isolated population in north-central Crawford County have a gray-to-brown background with thin dark brown zig-zag transverse dorsal bands (chevrons) on their back, and diffuse light striping along each side of the back and between the limbs. Specimens from the SE Kansas populations grow much larger than the species does elsewhere in the state. Individuals from these populations attain a greater maximum size than the species does elsewhere in the state.
Elsewhere in Kansas, the light side stripes are much more distinct and with greater contrast. Between the light stripe are two darker brown stripes (often spotted or speckled with black and white) and a bluish-gray stripe that starts behind the head and extends onto the tail.
Males in both populations have blue scales along the sides of their bellies during the spring breeding season. The young are patterned similarity to the adults, but often less distinctly.
Adults normally 90-180 mm (3½-7 inches) in total length. The largest specimen from Kansas, sex undetermined, (FHSM 4254) is from Cherokee County with a snout-vent length of 75 mm and total length of 165 mm (6¼ inches) was collected by L. H. Panks on 29 April 1967. The maximum length throughout the range is 190.5 mm (7½ inches) (Powell et al., 2016).

Distribution:
This species is most common in areas of rangeland and along sandy riparian corridors. In many areas, it is absent or rare, and most populations are somewhat localized. In the Cross Timbers, Ozark Plateau, and north-central Crawford County it is found in open woodland and woodland edge (usually in association with surface rocks).
There are records over much of western Missouri, south of the Missouri River (Daniel and Edmond, 2018). Many records approach within 10 miles of Kansas, near Johnson, Miami, Cherokee, and Bourbon counties. This species may eventually be discovered in Bourbon, Linn, and Miami counties.
The record for Anderson County (Collins, 1982) lacks specific locality information and is over 80 years old, and field work over the last two decades has not resulted in new records from that area. In addition, the records for Douglas County (Collins, 1982), most of which are over 40 years old, are possibly the result of downriver rafting during flooding (Heger and Sherrin, 1991) which apparently did not result in successful establishment of this lizard. Collins (1993) omitted both of those records pending the discovery of additional specimens.
(,   Museum Voucher) (,   Observation) (,   Literature Record) (,   iNat Record), (  Fossil)
Open icons are questionable records; Click on a marker to view details.
Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 1,476
    Records 
  • 1,379
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 97
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Anderson (6); Barber (49); Barton (3); Chautauqua (8); Cherokee (134); Cheyenne (7); Clark (28); Comanche (10); Cowley (14); Crawford (5); Decatur (1); Dickinson (1); Douglas (21); Edwards (4); Ellis (242); Ellsworth (49); Ford (1); Gove (73); Graham (15); Grant (2); Gray (1); Harper (11); Harvey (6); Haskell (7); Johnson (2); Kearney (2); Kingman (51); Kiowa (7); Lane (13); Lincoln (3); Logan (74); McPherson (26); Meade (51); Miami (1); Mitchell (1); Montgomery (2); Morton (52); Neosho (2); Ness (1); Norton (6); Pawnee (16); Phillips (2); Pottawatomie (2); Pratt (11); Rawlins (10); Reno (61); Rice (5); Riley (26); Rooks (16); Rush (1); Russell (100); Saline (7); Scott (46); Sedgwick (18); Seward (29); Shawnee (1); Sheridan (1); Stafford (32); Stanton (1); Stevens (2); Sumner (15); Trego (64); Unknown (7); Wabaunsee (3); Wallace (5); Washington (1); Wichita (2);

Fossil History:
Pleistocene fossil specimens are known from Meade County.
Fossils from the Sandahl Local Fauna of McPherson County (Pleistocene: Illinoian) (Holman 1971; Preston 1979; Holman 1995) are assignable to this taxon or Holbrookia.

Natural History:
Commonly referred to as 'Fence Lizard', because they can often be seen perched atop wooden or stone fence posts as they bask and survey the area for predators and food.
Werth (1972) and Platt (1985) studied this lizard in Kansas, and some of my information is from their observations. The Prairie Lizard lives in a wide variety of habitats. In eastern Kansas, it prefers dry, open forests and readily climbs trees to escape enemies. In southcentral western Kansas, this lizard inhabits low, sandy regions and frequently is found along sandstone and limestone outcrops.
Prairie Lizards are active from March to October at temperatures above 70°F. During winter months, they burrow beneath the ground to avoid cold temperatures. This lizard is active during the day and in western Kansas has a small home range of one-tenth of an acre. Each male generally has a harem of two to three females within his territory. When disturbed near trees, this lizard climbs quickly, always keeping the trunk between it and the disturbance.
William L. Hoyle (Burt and Hoyle, 1935) observed individuals on 30 April 1933 in Cowley county, Kansas. When approached, the lizards darted for shelter in holes at the base of the yucca plants.
The Prairie Lizard spends much time basking on logs and rocks and looking for food. In western Kansas, it appears to be active from 1100 to 1300 hours, avoids the extreme midday heat, and is again active from 1500 to 1700 hours.
Hartman (1906) reported that they are often found climbing weeds or brush, and discovered one on a sunflower stalk three feet off the ground. They are active by day and usually sleep close to their perch each night. They eat small invertebrates and in turn are preyed upon by mammals, birds, other reptiles, and a few larger invertebrates. Hartman (1906) examined five specimens from Kansas, that had eaten grasshoppers (mostly nymphs), ground-beetles, and leaf-hoppers.
DeMarco et al. (1985) dissected 55 wild-caught specimens from Stafford County and recorded the following prey items (in decreasing abundance): Formicidae (ants), Coleoptera (beetles), Homoptera (plant-hoppers), Hemiptera (true bugs), Diptera (flies), Araneida (orb weavers), Collembola (springtails), Orthoptera (grasshoppers), Hymenoptera (bees), Neuroptera (lacewings), Lepidoptera (moths), and Gastropoda (snails).
Werth (1972) and Fitch (1970) investigated the breeding of the Prairie Lizard in Kansas. Breeding occurs during the warm months from May to August, and females probably produce two or three clutches of eggs per season. Courtship involves the male quickly approaching the female, mounting her, and curling his hindquarters beneath her tail until their cloacae meet and copulation occurs. An average of seven eggs (Fitch, 1985) are laid in nests beneath the ground in loose soil and hatch in about two months. A female from Barber County laid five eggs on 18 May (Eric M. Rundquist, pers. comm. 1989; Collins, 1993).
Predators of this lizard include larger lizards, snakes, birds, and small mammals. Knight and Collins (1977) reported predation on this lizard by a Milk Snake in Cheyenne County.

Occurrence Activity:
Number of Unique Obervations (=days): 191; Range: 02 Jan to 17 Dec
Remarks:
The first possible reference to the Prairie Lizard in present-day Kansas was made by Cope (1860) commenting on a specimen "... obtained in a collection made between Fort Riley and Pike's Peak, Kansas." At a time when Kansas Territory stretched west to the continental divide. Cragin (1880) definitely reports it from Kansas based on a specimen in the United States National Museum from Riley County, and another collected by Kansas State University entomologist Edwin A. Popenoe near Rooks County. Neither of these specimens is currently known. The oldest existing specimen from Kansas is Field Museum of Natural History (FHSM 17046) collected in Seward County on 9 May 1904. Another series of four specimens (FMNH 17047-50) were collected the same day in Reno County.
 Populations in the Cross Timbers, Ozark Plateau, and north-central Crawford County are markedly different in size, coloration, and pattern from populations elsewhere in the state (see Description above).
Based on a captive specimen, Snider and Bowler (1992) reported a maximum longevity for this species of one year, one month, and four days.

Bibliography:
1860 Cope, Edward D. Supplement to "A catalogue of the venomous serpents in the Museum of the Academy," etc. Supplement to "A catalogue of the venomous serpents in the Museum of the Academy" etc 12():72-74
1880 Cragin, Francis W. A preliminary catalogue of Kansas reptiles and batrachians Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 7():112-123
Also listed the Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea) [=Ophibolus doliatus var. coccineus] and Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) [=Spelerpes ruber] from Kansas.
1882 Yarrow, Henry C. Check list of North American Reptilia and Batrachia with catalogue of specimens in U. S. National Museum. Bulletin of the United States National Museum (24):1-249
A summary of all herpetological species known at the time, with reference to specimens in the United States National Museum. Including one three Acris blanchardi from Fort Riley; Agkistrodon contortrix from Fort Riley; three Ambystoma mavortium from "Kansas" and another from Fort Riley; one Anaxyrus woodhousii from "Kansas"; one Anaxyrus cognatus from "Kansas" and another from Fort Riley; one Carphophis vermis from Fort Scott; three Coluber constrictor from "Kansas" and two from Fort Riley; one Crotalus horridus from 1858; one Diadophis punctatus from Hyatt [Hyette sic], Kansas (Anderson County); one Graptemys pseudogeographica from the Republican River in Kansas;   two Heterodon nasicus from Fort Riley; one Lampropeltis calligaster from Neosho Falls; one Lampropeltis holbrooki from Fort Riley, one from "Natchez", Kansas, and one other from Shawnee Mission, Kansas;one Lampropeltis gentilis from Fort Riley and one other from the Republican River, Kansas; one Pantherophis obsoletus from Fort Riley;fourteen Phrynosoma douglassi from "Kansas" and four from Fort Riley; three Phrynosoma cornutum from Fort Riley (Riley County);  three Pituophis catenifer from "Platte Valley", Kansas [likely from eastern Colorado prior to 1861] and two specimens from Fort Riley; one Plestiodon septentrionalis from Neosho Falls (Woodson County); one Plestiodon obsoletus from Fort Riley; one Thamnophis sirtalis from "Kansas"; one Nerodia sipedon from Fort Riley and another from Neosho Falls; one Scincella lateralis from Fort Scott (Bourbon County); one Thamnophis proximus from Fort Riley; four Sceloporus consobrinus from Fort Riley; one Tantilla nigriceps from Fort Riley; four Thamnophis sirtalis from "Kansas" and two from Little Blue River, Kansas; 
1885 Cragin, Francis W. Recent additions to the list of Kansas reptiles and batrachians, with further notes on species previously reported. Bulletin of the Washburn College Laboratory of Natural History 1(3):100-103
1885 Cragin, Francis W. Second contribution to the herpetology of Kansas, with observations on the Kansas fauna. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 9():136-140
1900 Cope, Edward D. The crocodilians, lizards and snakes of North America. Pages 153-1270 in Report of the U. S. National Museum for the Year Ending June 30, 1898 , Washington, D. C. pp.
1906 Hartman, Frank A. Food habits of Kansas lizards and batrachians. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 20():225-229
1911 Hurter, Julius. Herpetology of Missouri. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 20(5):59-274
1916 Householder, Victor H. The Lizards and Turtles of Kansas with Notes on Their Distribution and Habitat. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 100pp.
1920 Taylor, Edward H. The Lizards of Kansas with Notes on Habits. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 117pp.
Though Dr. Taylor's thesis lists 1916 as the publication date (as does version that the KHS published in 1993). His degree was not awarded until 1920, which is the official publication date.
1926 Burnett, William L. Notes on Colorado herpetology. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology and Entomology 1(1):1-4
1926 Jones, J. Paul. The proper name for Sceloporus consobrinus Baird and Girard. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan 172():1-3
1928 Burt, Charles E. A key to the species of lizards definitely reported from Kansas. Privately printed, Enterprise Press, Bristow, Nebraska. pp.
Essentially a separate from the writer's "Lizards of. Kansas" which was in-press in the Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis (Burt 1928. 26(1):1-81). Includes a glossary and a note on the variation in Sceloporus undulatus thayerii (= Sceloporus consobrinus).
1928 Burt, Charles E. Insect food of Kansas lizards with notes on feeding habits. Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 1(3):50-68
1928 Burt, Charles E. The lizards of Kansas. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 26(1):1-81
1929 Burt, Charles E. and May Danheim Burt. A collection of amphibians and reptiles from the Mississippi valley, with field observations. American Museum Novitates (381):1-14
1929 Taylor, Edward H. List of reptiles and batrachians of Morton County, Kansas, reporting species new to the state fauna. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 19(6):63-65
Annotated listing of 25 species discovered in southwest Morton County just prior to the Dust Bowl that wreaked havoc on the region and the subsequent creation of the Cimarron National Grassland. Of special note are Heterodon platirhinos, Thamnophis marcianus, and Anaxyrus debilis (all of which have not been found in the area since).
1933 Burt, Charles E. Some distributional and ecological records of Kansas reptiles. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 26():186-208
1934 Brennan, Lawrence A. A check list of the amphibians and reptiles of Ellis County, Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 37():189-191
1934 Burt, Charles E. and W. L. Hoyle. Additional records of the reptiles of the central prairie region of the United States. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 37():193-216
1935 Brennan, Lawrence A. Notes on the Distribution of Amphibia and Reptilia of Ellis County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 114pp.
1935 Burt, Charles E. Further records of the ecology and distribution of amphibians and reptiles in the middle west. American Midland Naturalist 16(3):311-366
1935 Burt, Charles E. A key to the lizards of the United States and Canada. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 38():255-305
1936 Hurd, Myron Alec. The reptiles of Cherokee County, Kansas. Thesis. Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas. 103pp.
Under the supervision of thesis adviser Harry H. Hall. Report on 38 species (8 turtles, 7 lizards, and 23 snakes)... most unsubstantiated. Interesting inclusion are Crotalus horridus, Crotalus viridis, Kinosternon subrubrum, Opheodrys vernalis, and Phrynosoma cornutum.
1936 Brumwell, Malcolm J. Distributional records of the reptilia and amphibians of Kansas. Privately printed, . 22pp.
County dot maps of the Kansas herpetofauna. This work has been attributed to have been written around 1933, but that may be in error. 
Hypsiglena jani was not known from Kansas until Claude W. Hibbard collected three specimens on the Stevenson Ranch in north-central Clark County (above Clark State Lake) during June 1936 (Hibbard, 1937). Brumwell plotted this locality, which leads me to believe that the 1936 would have been the earliest date this manuscript could have been written.
1936 Hoyle, William L. Notes on faunal collection in Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 39():283-293
1937 Brennan, Lawrence A. A study of the habitat of reptiles and amphibians of Ellis County, Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 40():341-347
1938 Smith, Hobart M. Remarks on the status of the subspecies of Sceloporus undulatus, with descriptions of new species and subspecies of the undulatus group. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (387):1-17
1939 Smith, Hobart M. The Mexican and Central American lizards of the genus Sceloporus. Zoological Series, Field Museum of Natural History 26():397
Mentions collecting Sceloporus in Kansas. p 12
1939 Tihen, Joseph A. and James M. Sprague. Amphibians, reptiles, and mammals of the Meade County State Park Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 42():499-512
1940 Carpenter, J. R. The grassland biome. Ecological Monographs 10():617-684
1941 Loewen, Solomon L. A polydactylous lizard. Copeia 1941(1):48-49
1942 Hudson, G. E. The amphibians and reptiles of Nebraska. Nebraska Conservation Bulletin 24():1-146
1944 Marr, John C. Notes on amphibians and reptiles from the central United States. American Midland Naturalist 32(2):478-490
1947 Hall, Henry H. and Hobart M. Smith. Selected records of reptiles and amphibians from southeastern Kansas Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 49(4):447-454
Report on certain Kansas specimens housed in the collection at what is now Pittsburg State University. Included are several species of dubious status today, including Cryptobranchus alleganiensis from the Neosho and Spring rivers (the only specimens from those significant drainages ever documented), Ambystoma maculatum from just north of Pittsburg, Crawford County, Heterodon nasicus from Crawford County, Opheodrys vernalis from Crawford County, Sonora episcopa from Crawford County, Agkistrodon piscivorus from Cherokee County, Crotalus atrox from Crawford County, and Crotalus viridis from Crawford County. They report several significant range extensions including Kinosternon flavescens from Turkey Creek in southeast Cherokee County, Graptemys geographica from just north of Pittsburg, Crotaphytus collaris from near Columbus, Cherokee County, Sceloporus consobrinus from just north of Pittsburg, Phrynosoma cornutum from Cherokee and Crawford counties, Heterodon platirhinos from Cherokee and Crawford counties, Haldea striatula from Crawford County, Sistrurus tergeminus from Crawford County, and a 402 lb Macrochelys temminckii in Cherokee County from just east of Chetopa (Labette County). They allude to the potential for Anaxyrus fowleri to occur in southeast Kansas and for native populations of Crotalus atrox in south central Kansas (in part from the disclosure that John R. Breukelman [then of ESU] had obtained three specimens in Woods County Oklahoma, 3/4 of a mile south of the Kansas line). None of the specimens the paper was based on, exist today.
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
The first modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table and text say 97 on p. 10) and 13 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies.
1951 Wolfenbarger, Keith. A. Systematic and Biological Studies on North American Chiggers of the genus Eutrombicula (Acarina, Trombiculidae). Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 77pp.
1951 Brumwell, Malcolm J. An ecological survey of the Fort Leavenworth Military Reservation American Midland Naturalist 45(1):187-231
Published posthumously. Lieutenant Brumwell died December 14, 1941, as a result of injuries incurred during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. This paper is a condensed version of his thesis for the Master's degree.
1951 Breukelman, John and Robert F. Clarke. A revised list of amphibia and reptiles of Chase and Lyon Counties, Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 54():542-545
1953 Schmidt, Karl P. A Check List of North American Amphibians and Reptiles. 6th Edition. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois. 280pp.
Schmidt's first edition of his standardized checklist to North American amphibians and reptiles. Includes several specific references to Kansas in the range descriptions.
1956 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. Second edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (9):1-356
Hobart M. Smith's updated second edition of his first (1950) modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table says 97 on p. 10; text says 98 on p. 10) and 11 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies. The second edition has updated taxonomy, added Plestiodon laticeps, and removed Eurycea tynerensis.
1956 Loomis, Richard B. The chigger mites of Kansas (Acarina, Trombiculidae). University of Kansas Science Bulletin 37():1195-1443
Examined 2,628 Kansas reptiles of 48 species consisting of 27 turtles of 4 species, 1,736 lizards of 12 species and 892 snakes of 32 species for chiggers. Eleven species of chiggers were recovered from reptiles.
For amphibians, 1188 individuals of 21 species were examined. Five species of chigger mite were recovered from amphibians.
1958 Smith, Ronald E. Natural history of the Prairie Dog in Kansas. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publications (16):1-36
1959 Collins, H. H. Complete Field Guide to American Wildlife. Harper and Brothers, New York. pp.
1960 Etheridge, Richard E. Additional notes on the lizards of the Cragin Quarry fauna. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters 45():113-117
1962 Gish, Charles D. The Herpetofauna of Ellis County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 34pp.
1965 Clarke, Robert F. Lizards in Kansas. Kansas School Naturalist 11(4):1-16
1966 Fuller, C. C. Observations of the Behavior of the Lizard Sceloporus undulatus in Captivity. Thesis. Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas. 34pp.
1967 Fleharty, Eugene D. and Dwight R. Ittner. Additional locality records for some Kansas herptiles. Southwestern Naturalist 12(2):199-200
1967 Gier, Herschel T. Vertebrates of the Flint Hills. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 70(1):51-59
1970 Cochran, Doris M. and Colman J. Goin. The New Field Book of Reptiles and Amphibians. Putnam's Sons, New York. pp.
1970 Fitch, Henry S. Reproductive cycles in lizards and snakes. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (52):1-247
1972 Werth, Robert J. Lizard ecology: evidence of competition. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 75():283-300
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
Joseph T. Collins first Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Smith 1956)>
1974 Perry, Janice. KHS members take trip to southwest Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (3):2-3
Account of a search for Crotalus atrox and other species discovered in Comanche County.
1974 Fleharty, Eugene D. and Jerry D. Johnson. Distributional records of herptiles from the Chautauqua Hills of southeastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 77(1):65-67
1974 Karns, Daryl, Ray E. Ashton, Jr., and Thomas Swearingen. Illustrated Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas: An Identification Manual. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History Public Education Series(2):viii + 18
1975 Rundquist, Eric M. Amphibians and Reptiles of Kingman County, Kansas. Privately Printed, Lawrence, Kansas. 3pp.
Short accounts for twenty-nine recognized amphibians and reptiles from Kingman County, Kansas. With habitat descriptions and for some species, estimates of population density.
1975 Rundquist, Eric M. First KHS field trip yields three county records. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (7):1-3
Narration of the activities and species found during the KHS field trip to Kingman County, Kansas. From the title of the article, there were three county records were obtained, however, only Plestiodon septentrionalis is indicated as being 'new'.
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Derickson, W. K. Lipid storage and utilization in reptiles. American Zoologist 16():711-723
1976 Derickson, W. Kenneth. Ecological and physiological aspects of reproductive strategies in two lizards. Ecology 57(3):445-458
1977 Knight, James L. and Joseph T. Collins. The amphibians and reptiles of Cheyenne County, Kansas, Report Number 15. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 19pp.
1977 Perry, Janice. Kansas herps needed. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (18):2-3
List of Kansas amphibians and reptiles desired for the SSAR/HL meeting to be held 7-13 August 1977.
1977 Trott, Gene. Chikaskia River wildlife study. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (19):2-3
1978 Curl, Richard L. Final Environmental Statement: Milford Lake Kansas operation and maintenance. US Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. 158pp.
Notable mentions: Spotted Salamander, Smooth Green Snake
1978 Ferguson, Gary W. and C. H. Bohlen. Demographic analysis: A tool for the study of natural selection of behavioral traits. Pages 227-243 in Behavior and Neurology of Lizards: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium Publication No. (ADM) 77491. U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, D. C. pp.
1978 Warner, M. and R. Wencel. Chikaskia River study held near Caldwell. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (25):15-16
1978 Collins, Joseph T. and Janalee P. Caldwell. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1977. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 6():70-88
1978 Fitch, Henry S. Sexual size differences in the genus Sceloporus. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 51(13):441-461
1978 Fitch, Henry S. Sexual size differences in the genus Sceloporus. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 51(13):441-461
1979 Ports, Mark A. Occurrence and density studies of nongame wildlife in southwestern Kansas - May 16-August 16, 1979. Kansas Fish and Game Commission, Pratt, Kansas. 83pp.
1979 Gray, Peter and Eddie Stegall. A field trip to the Red Hills. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (29):6-8
1979 Gray, Peter. Low attendance slows KHS. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (32):1
1979 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1978. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 8():56-66
1979 Holman, J. Alan. Herpetofauna of the Nash local fauna (Pleistocene: Aftonian) of Kansas. Copeia 1979(4):747-749
1980 Clarke, Robert F. Herptiles and fishes of the western Arkansas River in Kansas. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 55pp.
A summary of known information on the amphibian, reptile, and fish faunas of the Arkansas River above Great Bend. The report details associated field activities for procuring fish, however no new surveys for amphibians and reptiles were undertaken. Information on herps from Finney County was provided by Michael Rush (FHSU) and thus made available before the publication of his thesis (Rush, 1981). The western Arkansas River drainage had experienced little attention by herpetologists before this study, and the species accounts reflect that paucity of data. Additionally, the report omits several older records (e.g. for Anaxyrus debilisThamnophis cyrtopsis, and Lampropeltis calligaster) from the westernmost reaches of the Arkansas River drainage in Kansas.
1980 Ferguson, Gary W, Charles H. Bohlen, and H. Patrick Woolley. Sceloporus undulatus: Comparative life history and regulation of a Kansas population. Ecology 61(2):313-322
1980 Ferguson, Gary W. and Todd Brockman. Geographic differences of growth rate of Sceloporus lizards (Sauria: Iguanidae). Copeia 1980(2):259-264
1981 Guarisco, Hank. Fall field trip of the KHS at Wilson Lake very enjoyable. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (45):2-3
1981 Eshelman, Ralph E. and Claude W. Hibbard. Nash Local Fauna (Pleistocene: Aftonian) of Meade County, Kansas. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, The University of Michigan 25(16):317-326
1981 Ballinger, Royce E., D. L. Droge, and S. M. Jones. Reproduction in a Nebraska sandhills population of the Northern Prairie Lizard Sceloporus undulatus garmani. American Midland Naturalist 106():157-164
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Report to the Kansas Fish and Game Commission on the status of three amphibians in southeastern Kansas. Kansas Fish and Game Commission, Pratt. 57pp.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
Joseph T. Collins second Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1974)>
1983 Ferguson, G.W., J.L. Hughes, and K.L. Brown. Food availability and territorial establishment of juvenile Sceloporus undulatus. Pages 134-148 in Lizard Ecology Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. pp.
1983 Trott, Gene. Chikaskia River wildlife study. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (52):3-4
1983 Irwin, Kelly J. Meade County KHS field trip successful. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (53):4-5
1983 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1982 . Technical Publication of the State Biological Survey of Kansas 13():9-21
1984 Brown, Kenneth L. Pomona: A plains village variant in eastern Kansas and western Missouri. Dissertation. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 519pp.
1984 Heinrich, Mark L. Herpetofauna of the Konza Prairie Research Natural Area in the Flint Hills region of Kansas with respect to habitat selection. Thesis. Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. 57pp.
1984 Secor, Stephen M. and Charles C. Carpenter. Distribution maps of Oklahoma reptiles. Oklahoma Herpetological Society Special Publication (3):1-57
1985 Collins, Joseph T. (Editor) Natural Kansas. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence. pp.
1985 Miller, Larry L. KHS 1985 field trip to Kirwin Reservoir. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (61):11-12
1985 Fitch, Henry S. Variation in clutch and litter size in New World reptiles. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (76):1-76
1985 Lynch, John D. Annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of Nebraska. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Science 13():33-57
1985 DeMarco, Vincent G., Ray W. Drenner, and G. W. Ferguson. Maximum prey size of an insectivorous lizard, Sceloporus undulatus garmani. Copeia 1985(4):1077-1080
Correlation of lizard body size with prey size on 55 wild-caught Secloporus from Stafford County, Kansas. Their study suggests that the upper size limitof prey available as forage to an insectivorous lizard is best predicted by the lizard's mouth circumference. Wild-caught lizards contained Formicidae (ants), Coleoptera (beetles), Homoptera (plant-hoppers), Hemiptera (true bugs), Diptera (flies), Araneida (orb weavers), Colembola (springtails), Orthoptera (grasshoppers), Hymenoptera (bees), Neuroptera (lacewings), Lepidoptera (moths), and Gastropoda (snails).
1986 Ferguson, G.W. and H.L. Snell. Endogenous control of seasonal change of egg, hatchling, and clutch size of the lizard Sceloporus undulatus garmani. Herpetologica 42():185-191
1987 Simmons, John E. September 1987 field trip report. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (69):42894
1987 Jones, S. M. and Royce E. Ballinger. Comparative life histories of Holbrookia maculata and Sceloporus undulatus in western Nebraska. Ecology 68():1828-1,838
1988 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1987. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (71):13-19
1988 Nulton, Michael T. and Michael S. Rush. New county records of amphibians and reptiles in Gray County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (74):10-12
1989 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1988. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (75):15-18
1989 Collins, Joseph T. First Kansas herp counts held in 1989. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (77):11-
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Results of second Kansas herp count held during April-May 1990. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):10-12
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Reptiles and Amphibians of the Cimarron National Grasslands, Morton County, Kansas. U. S. Forest Service, Elkhart, Kansas. 60pp.
1991 Collins, Joseph T. Results of third Kansas herp count held during April-May 1991. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (85):9-13
1991 Heger, N. A. and J. Sherrin. Life history notes: Sceloporus undulatus. Rafting. Herpetological Review 22(2):59-60
1991 Smith, Hobart M., Matthew S. Rand, J. David Drew, Bruce D. Smith, David Chiszar, and Christine M. Dwyer. Relictual intergrades between the Northern Prairie Lizard (Sceloporus undulatus garmani) and the Redlipped Plateau Lizard (S. u. erythrocheilus) in Colorado. Northwestern Naturalist 72():42746
1992 Collins, Joseph T. Results of the fourth Kansas herp count held during April-May 1992. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (89):10-
1992 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS annual field trip to Sheridan County State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (90):3-4
1992 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the KHS 1992 fall field trip. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (90):4
1992 Sites, Jack W., Jr., J. W. Archie, C. J. Cole, and O. Flores Villela. A review of phylogenetic hypotheses for lizards of the genus Sceloporus (Phrynosomatidae): implications for ecological and evolutionary studies. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (213):1-110
1992 Smith, Hobart M., E. L. Bell, J. S. Applegarth, and David Chiszar. Adaptive convergence in the lizard superspecies Sceloporus undulatus. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 28():123-149
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
Joseph T. Collins third Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1982)>
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the fifth Kansas herp count held during April-June 1993 . Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (94):7-11
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (97):5-14
See, 1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Additions and corrections [to the results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994]. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):4.
1995 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the seventh annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1995. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (101):11-17
1995 Bell, Edwin. History and the authorship of the name of the Fence Lizard, Sceloporus undulatus (Bosc and Daudin in Sonnini and LaTreille). Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 31(1):15-27
1995 Smith, Hobart M., David Chiszar, and J. A. Lemosespinal. A new subspecies of the polytypic lizard species Sceloporus undulatus (Sauria: Iguanidae) from northern Mexico. Texas Journal of Science 47():117-143
1996 Busby, William H., Joseph T. Collins, and Jeffery R. Parmelee. The Reptiles and Amphibians of Fort Riley and Vicinity. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. pp.
1996 Miller, Larry L. Results of the KHS 1995 fall field trip. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (103):3
1996 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eighth annual KHS herp counts Held 1 April-31 May 1996. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (104):6-17
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1996 Lemos-Espinal, J. A., G. R. Smith, and R. E. Ballinger. Covariation of egg size, clutch size, and offspring survivorship in the genus Sceloporus. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 32():58-66
1996 Bell, Edwin L. Descriptions of neotypes for Sceloporus undulatus undulatus, the Southern Fence Lizard, and Sceloporus undulatus hyacinthinus, the Northern Fence Lizard, and a lectotype for Sceloporus undulatus garmani, the Northern Prairie Lizard. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society 32():81-103
1996 Busby, William H. and Jeffery R. Parmelee. Historical changes in a herpetofaunal assemblage in the Flint Hills of Kansas. American Midland Naturalist 135():81-91
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the ninth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1997. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (108):12-17
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Addendum to 1997 KHS herp counts. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (109):14-15
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. A Key to Amphibians & Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 131pp.
1998 Gamble, Jerre. Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartford, Kansas. 91pp.
1998 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the tenth annual KHS herp counts for 1998, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (112):11-18
1999 Taggart, Travis W. Cherokee County fall 1999 herp count. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (117):6
Reported Anaxyrus woodhousii was likely A. fowleri.
2000 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1999. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (119):7-9
2000 Taggart, Travis W. Biogeographic analysis of the reptiles (Squamata) in Ellis County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (121):7-16
2000 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eleventh and twelfth annual KHS herpetofaunal counts for 1999-2000, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):11-16
2001 Schmidt, Curtis J. The amphibians, turtles, and reptiles of the Smoky Valley Ranch, Logan County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (124):9-11
2001 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the thirteenth annual KHS herp counts for 2001, held 1 April-30 June. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (125):13-16
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2002 Miller, Larry L. and M. Williams. Geographic distribution: Sceloporus consobrinus. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (3):13
2002 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the spring 2002 KHS field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (3):6-7
To the Cimarron National Grassland, in Morton and Stevens counties.
2002 Miller, Larry L. Sumner County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):15
2002 Rundquist, Eric M. Natural history of the Night Snake, Hypsiglena torquata, in Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):16-20
2002 Leache, Adam D. and Tod W. Reeder. Molecular systematics of the Eastern Fence Lizard (Sceloporus undulatus): A comparison of parsimony, likelihood, and bayesian approaches. Systematic Biology 51(1):44–68
2002 Miles, D. B., R. Noecker, W. M. Roosenburg, and M. M. White. Genetic relationships among populations of Sceloporus undulatus fail to support present subspecific designations. Herpetologica 58():277-292
2003 Suleiman, G. Fort Riley herpetofaunal count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):11-12
2003 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 2002. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):13-16
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2003 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):3-4
2003 Platt, Dwight R. Lizards and snakes (Order Squamata) of Harvey County, Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):13-20
2003 Miller, Larry L. Sumner County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):10
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Logan County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):8
2004 Schmidt, Curtis J. Natural history and status of the exploited Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) in western Kansas and a herpetofaunal inventory of the Smoky Valley Ranch, Logan County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. pp.
2004 Delisle, Jennifer M. and William H. Busby. Biological inventory for vertebrates at Fort Larned National Historic Site of the southern plains network. Natural Heritage Inventory, Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 61pp.
2004 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2004 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (9):2
2004 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2004 KHS spring field trip to Logan County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (10):2-7
2004 Miller, Larry L. Sumner County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):11-12
2004 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2004 fall feld trip . Journal of Kansas Herpetology (12):15-16
2005 Busby, William H., Joseph T. Collins, and G. Suleiman. The Snakes, Lizards, Turtles, and Amphibians of Fort Riley and Vicinity. 2nd (revised) ed. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. pp.
2005 Taggart, Travis W., Curtis J. Schmidt, and Richard S. Hayes. Geographic distribution: Sceloporus consobrinus. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (13):10
2005 Schmidt, Curtis J. and Travis W. Taggart. Life history: Sceloporus consobrinus. New state maximum length. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (14):10
2006 Bartlett, Richard D. and Patricia P. Bartlett. Guide and Reference to the Crocodilians, Turtles, and Lizards of Eastern and Central North America (North of Mexico). University Press of Florida, Gainesville. pp.
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2007 Taggart, Travis W., Joseph T. Collins, and Curtis J. Schmidt. Estimates of amphibian, reptile, and turtle mortality if Phostoxin is applied to 10,000 acres of prairie dog burrows in Logan County, Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. 5pp.
2008 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2008 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (25):2-3
2009 Leache, Adam D. Species tree discordance traces to phylogeographic clade boundaries in North American Fence Lizards (Sceloporus). Systematic Biology 58(6):547-559
2010 Miller, Larry L. Investigation of the Checkered Garter Snake in Kansas with notes on other Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles encountered. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 31pp.
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
Joseph T. Collins fourth Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1993)>
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Spring Field Trip to Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (38):2-4
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 Summer Field Trip to Scott State Park Journal of Kansas Herpetology (39):2
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2012 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada: Second Edition, Revised and Updated. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 152pp.
2012 Hamilton, Bryan Tyler, Rachel Hart , and Jack W. Sites Jr. Feeding ecology of the Milksnake (Lampropeltis triangulum, Colubridae) in the western United States. Journal of Herpetology 46(4):515-522
2013 Dixon, James R. Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps. Third Edition, Revised and Updated. Texas A&M University Press, College Station, Texas. 460pp.
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Summer Field Trip to Meade County State Park. Collinsorum 2(3/4):3
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Spring Field Trip to Schermerhorn Park, Cherokee County. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Summer Field Trip to Coldwater Lake, Comanche County. Collinsorum 2(3/4):5
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS Spring Field Trip to Barber County Collinsorum 3(2-4):11
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS summer field trip to Morton County and adjacent Colorado, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Collinsorum 3(2-4):12
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Recent scientific and standard English name changes effecting the Kansas herpetofauna. Collinsorum 3(2-4):9-10
2015 Brown, Kasandra A. Occupancy Modeling Of Herpetofauna And Grassland Nesting Birds At Quivira National Wildlife Refuge. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 72pp.
2015 Taggart, Travis W. Spring Field Trip to the Greenhorn Limestone of Russell County. Collinsorum 4(3):2
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2016 Taggart, Travis W. Spring 2016 KHS field trip to Clark County was a soggy success. Collinsorum 5(2-3):2-3
2016 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS ‘Fall’ field trip to Barber County. Collinsorum 5(2-3):6-7
2017 Taggart, Travis W. and J. Daren Riedle. A Pocket Guide to Kansas Amphibians, Turtles and Lizards. Great Plains Nature Center, Wichita, Kansas. 69pp.
2017 Crother, Brian I. (editor) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding. Eighth edition. Herpetological Circulars (43):102
2017 Taggart, Travis W. Herp Count: Clark County State Lake. Collinsorum 6(2-3):9
2018 Daniel, Richard E. and Brian S. Edmond. Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2017. Privately printed, Columbia, Missouri.. 85pp.
2019 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Third Edition. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 192pp.
2020 Daniel, Richard E. and Brian S. Edmond. Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2019. Privately printed, Columbia, Missouri. 86pp.
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
2020 Hullinger, Allison, Zackary Cordes, Daren Riedle, and William Stark. Habitat assessment of the Broad-headed Skink (Plestiodon laticeps) and the associated squamate community in eastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 123(1-2):137-150
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Cherokee County: KHS-2020-02 Collinsorum 9(3):11-12
2021 Mardis, Dexter R. Herp Count: Sumner County: KHS-2020-08. Collinsorum 9(3):12-13
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Morton County: KHS-2020-12. Collinsorum 9(3):13
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Comanche County: KHS-2020-15. Collinsorum 9(3):13-14
2021 Falcon, Melanie. Herp Count: McPherson County: KHS-2020-17. Collinsorum 9(3):14
2021 Schmidt, Curtis J. Herp Count: Russell County: KHS-2020-19. Collinsorum 9(3):14
2021 Taggart, Meg, Amelia Jaeger, Jesse J. Taggart, and Travis W. Taggart. Herp Count: Ellis County: KHS-2020-21. Collinsorum 9(3):14
2021 Taggart, Megan M. and Travis W. Taggart. Herp Count: Seward County: KHS-2020-27. Collinsorum 9(3):15
2021 Taggart, Travis W., Dan Fogell, and Christopher Visser. Herp Count: Russell County: KHS-2020-25. Collinsorum 9(3):15
2023 Russell, Elisabeth Habitat associations and fine-scale movements of the Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) in Kansas and the efficacy of remote telemetry for monitoring small-scale movements. Thesis. Fort Hays STate University, Hays, Kansas. 81pp.
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University