An adult Common Lesser Earless Lizard from Grant County. © Travis W. Taggart.
An adult Common Lesser Earless Lizard from Chase County, Kansas. © Justin Michels.
An adult male (top) and female (bottom) Common Lesser Earless Lizard from Grant County, Kansas. © Travis W. Taggart.
Ventral view of an adult female Common Lesser Earless Lizard, from Grant County, Kansas. Image © Travis W. Taggart.
An adult Common Lesser Earless Lizard from Logan County. © Angie Reisch.
An adult Common Lesser Earless Lizard from Chase County, Kansas. © Justin Michels.
Ventral view of an adult male Common Lesser Earless Lizard, from Grant County, Kansas. Image © Travis W. Taggart.
REPTILIA (Reptiles) SQUAMATA (PART) (Other Lizards) PHRYNOSOMATIDAE (Sand and Spiny Lizards)

Common Lesser Earless Lizard
Holbrookia maculata Girard 1851
hōl-brŏŏk-ē-ā — măk-ū-lā-tă


Conservation Status:

State: None

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S3 - Vulnerable
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None
Diagnosis:
The Common Lesser Earless Lizard is characterized by four limbs and the lack of an ear opening on each side of the head. The head, body, limbs, and tail of this species are light gray or gray-brown. The upper surface of the neck, back, and tail base are covered with 9- 14 dark brown spots. The belly is grayish and unmarked except for two or three blue-bordered, short, black bars which barely extend up onto the sides of the lizard. Adult males have grayer throats than females. Pregnant females develop orange coloration on their sides.
Adults are normally 100-130 mm (4-5¼ inches) in total length. The largest specimen from Kansas is a female (FHSM 6675) from Trego County with a snout-vent length of 60 mm and a total length of 122 mm (4¾ inches) collected by Dan E. Hesket on 22 March 1986. The maximum length throughout the range is 130.2 mm (5­1⁄8 inches) (Conant and Collins, 1998).

Distribution:
This lizard is known from the western two-thirds of the state. The records for Girard, Crawford County (AMNH 1450-1) and Neosho Falls, Woodson County (USNM 4692) are dubious and in need of verification.
Thirteen specimens from Elk County (KU 200-12) are recorded to the county only and are not mapped. Specimens from Greenwood (UCM 5689), Grant (USNM 71509), Graham (KU 237-41, 2159), Lane (KU 10985), Marion (KU 223-6), Osborne (UMMZ 71431, KU 298) and Wilson (AMNH 2682-4) counties are given only to county and are not mapped.
(,   Museum Voucher) (,   Observation) (,   Literature Record) (,   iNat Record), (  Fossil)
Open icons are questionable records; Click on a marker to view details.
Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 1,133
    Records 
  • 1,080
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 53
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Barber (16); Barton (6); Butler (3); Chase (7); Cheyenne (20); Clark (25); Comanche (15); Crawford (2); Dickinson (16); Edwards (4); Elk (14); Ellis (176); Ellsworth (10); Finney (39); Ford (17); Gove (16); Graham (6); Grant (7); Gray (2); Greeley (2); Greenwood (2); Hamilton (18); Harper (2); Harvey (31); Haskell (3); Hodgeman (1); Kearney (3); Kingman (7); Kiowa (10); Lane (2); Logan (21); Marion (4); McPherson (13); Meade (38); Mitchell (1); Morton (125); Ness (21); Norton (3); Osborne (3); Ottawa (1); Pawnee (1); Pratt (48); Rawlins (4); Reno (58); Rice (2); Rooks (2); Rush (1); Russell (21); Saline (1); Scott (1); Sedgwick (2); Seward (8); Smith (1); Stafford (87); Stanton (3); Stevens (2); Sumner (17); Thomas (1); Trego (32); Unknown (89); Wallace (28); Wichita (2); Wilson (6); Woodson (4);

Fossil History:
Pleistocene fossil specimens are known from Meade County.
Fossils from the Sandahl Local Fauna of McPherson County (Pleistocene: Illinoian) (Holman 1971; Preston 1979; Holman 1995) are assignable to this genus or Sceloporus.

Natural History:
Clarke (1965) and Werth (1972) studied this lizard in Kansas, supplying most of the known information from the state.
The Lesser Earless Lizard is restricted to flat, sandy, cultivated, clay, or gravel areas of loose soil with little or no vegetation. Its distribution in eastern Kansas is spotty because continuous habitat for this lizard apparently does not occur.
Knight and Collins (1977) considered this lizard most abundant around prairie dog towns in Cheyenne County but found it also in sandy areas around impoundments and along rivers.
This species is active from April to September when optimal temperatures prevail. The colder months are spent beneath the ground to avoid adverse temperatures.
Lesser Earless Lizards are active only during the day, basking and foraging for food. In western Kansas, there are two distinct periods of daily activity from about 1100 to 1300 hours and 1500 to 1700 hours. During the extremely hot period from 1300 to 1500 hours, these lizards frequently retreat to the shade of burrows. Preferred air temperature for this lizard appears to be above 70°F. Like many lizards, this species has a home range and is territorial. The home range may contain numerous individuals of both sexes, but one male is normally dominant. Males of this species display dominance by executing "push-ups" or "bobbing" in a distinct cadence.
According to Clarke (1965), a courting male Lesser Earless Lizard rapidly nods his head upon approaching a female and may nudge her on the side or beneath the tail with his nose. The male then grasps the receptive female by the loose skin between her shoulders and curls the rear of his body beneath her tail until their cloacae meet. Copulation lasts at least twenty seconds. Upon dismounting from the female, the male elevates the rear of his body and holds his tail up in an arching curve. Individuals reach sexual maturity have their first hibernation (Fitch, 1970). Gravid females are known from May, June, July, and August and hatchlings have been observed as early as 6 July. Breeding likely takes place in April and May and egg-laying in late May and tapering off into late July and August (Fitch, 1970). Fitch (1970) examined 47 egg-bearing females from Kansas and found they contained 2-8 eggs (avg. 4.95).
Females lay one to ten eggs (Fitch, 1985) during May or June. The eggs hatch in one to two months, depending on air temperatures during incubation.
According to Smith (1956), 75 percent of the diet of this lizard consists of grasshoppers and true bugs. Evidently, this species consumes large numbers of harmful insects and is beneficial to farmers. Hartman (1906) found small beetles and a grasshopper nymph in the stomachs of three specimens from Graham County.
Predators of the Lesser Earless Lizard include birds, small mammals, snakes, and larger lizards (Collins, 1993).

Occurrence Activity:
Number of Unique Obervations (=days): 132; Range: 06 Feb to 30 Oct
Remarks:
The Common Lesser Earless Lizard was first reported from Kansas by Hallowell (1857). The earliest available specimens (12 total) (Museum of Comparative Zoology [MCZ 2460; now MCZ 167918-167930) were collected by the famed landscape painter Albert Bierstadt at Fort Hays sometime during 1862 and received at the MCZ by 1874.
USNM 4692 (3 specimens from Neosho Falls, Woodson County collected by B. F. Goss) were published (p. 117) in Cochran (1961) as a paratype of Holbrookia maculata perspicua.
Axtell (1956) gave the name H. m. perspicua for those populations occurring in the Flint Hills of Kansas (and south into central Oklahoma and north-central Texas). He described their range as "... distributed on 'islands' of suitable habitat in the extensively eroded, dissected, or 'cut' plains of Texas, Oklahoma, and southeastern Kansas." In specimens from this population, the dorsal blotches are much more defined, and the white speckling is greatly reduced (to absent) in males. Additionally, the lateral blotches typically coalesce to form a single jagged band.
Axtell (ibid.) lists the following Kansas material (Butler Co.-1 mi. w. Keighly (UKMNH 17903 [currently listed as a Thamnophis radix from Harper County, correct catalog number is likely 17902]). Elk County: no specific locality (UKMNH 200-212). Woodson Co.-Neosho Falls (USNM 4692)). Additional populations that may be assignable to this taxon were discovered in Chase County in 1958 (KU 188465), 1963 (KU 98582), and 2009 (FHSM 14588; see Murrow (2009)).
Axtell (ibid.) regarded the populations west of the Flint Hills as the nominate subspecies (H. m. maculata).
By 2006, this species had seemingly disappeared from areas it was formerly abundant. Choate et al. (1981) found it the most common vertebrate on the Arkansas River sand-sage prairie south of Holcomb in Finny County. A subsequent survey of equal duration (Taggart 2006) at the same location failed to turn up any specimens.
Platt (1985, 1998) noted the decline of this taxon over the 40+ years he monitored reptile populations in Harvey County. Common Lesser Earless Lizards were regularly observed and caught in traps between 1959 and 1974, however during trapping efforts in 1984, 1985, 1997, and 1998, no specimens were collected, and only one was observed (in 1984). Platt (1998) went on to recommend that more information needs to be collected about the present distribution of this species in Kansas.
More recently, survey work has shown that this species has recovered in most areas. A comprehensive resurvey has not been initiated however and the fate of smaller, peripheral populations is unknown.

Bibliography:
1856 Hallowell, Edward. Notice of a collection of reptiles from Kansas and Nebraska presented to the Academy of Natural Sciences, by Doctor Hammond, U. S. A. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia 8():238-253
Contains reference to twenty-four species collected from 'Kansas', and includes the original description of Microps lineatus (=Tropidoclonion lineatum) from Kansas on page 241.
1859 Hallowell, Edward. Reports of Explorations and Surveys, to Ascertain the Most Practicable and Economical Route for a Railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean Vol. X, Part IV, No. 1, Washington, D. C. 1-27pp.
1875 Coues, Elliott. Synopsis of the reptiles and batrachians of Arizona with critical and field notes, and an extensive synonymy. Report upon Geographical and Geological Explorations and Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian. Volume 5. ():585-633
1880 Cragin, Francis W. A preliminary catalogue of Kansas reptiles and batrachians Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 7():112-123
Also listed the Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea) [=Ophibolus doliatus var. coccineus] and Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) [=Spelerpes ruber] from Kansas.
1885 Gunther, Albert C. L. G. Biologia Centrali-Américana. Reptilia and Batrachia.  1885-1902. Taylor and Francis, London. 326pp.
1900 Cope, Edward D. The crocodilians, lizards and snakes of North America. Pages 153-1270 in Report of the U. S. National Museum for the Year Ending June 30, 1898 , Washington, D. C. pp.
1906 Hartman, Frank A. Food habits of Kansas lizards and batrachians. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 20():225-229
1907 Ditmars, Raymond L. The Reptile Book; A comprehensive, Popularised Work on the Structure and Habits of the Turtles, Tortoises, Crocodilians, Lizards and Snakes which Inhabit the United States and Northern Mexico. Doubleday, Pae, and Company, New York. 472pp.
Several references to Kansas in the distribution of specific species accounts.
1916 Householder, Victor H. The Lizards and Turtles of Kansas with Notes on Their Distribution and Habitat. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 100pp.
1920 Taylor, Edward H. The Lizards of Kansas with Notes on Habits. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 117pp.
Though Dr. Taylor's thesis lists 1916 as the publication date (as does version that the KHS published in 1993). His degree was not awarded until 1920, which is the official publication date.
1921 Schmidt, Karl P. New species of North American lizards of the genera Holbrookia and Uta. American Museum Novitates (22):1-6
1922 Schmidt, Karl P. A review of the North American genus of lizards Holbrookia. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 46():709-725
1928 Burt, Charles E. A key to the species of lizards definitely reported from Kansas. Privately printed, Enterprise Press, Bristow, Nebraska. pp.
Essentially a separate from the writer's "Lizards of. Kansas" which was in-press in the Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis (Burt 1928. 26(1):1-81). Includes a glossary and a note on the variation in Sceloporus undulatus thayerii (= Sceloporus consobrinus).
1928 Ortenburger, Arthur I. The whip snakes and racers: Genera Masticophis and Coluber. Memiors of the University of Michigan Museum (1):1-247
1928 Burt, Charles E. Insect food of Kansas lizards with notes on feeding habits. Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 1(3):50-68
1928 Burt, Charles E. The lizards of Kansas. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 26(1):1-81
1929 Taylor, Edward H. List of reptiles and batrachians of Morton County, Kansas, reporting species new to the state fauna. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 19(6):63-65
Annotated listing of 25 species discovered in southwest Morton County just prior to the Dust Bowl that wreaked havoc on the region and the subsequent creation of the Cimarron National Grassland. Of special note are Heterodon platirhinos, Thamnophis marcianus, and Anaxyrus debilis (all of which have not been found in the area since).
1933 Burt, Charles E. Some distributional and ecological records of Kansas reptiles. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 26():186-208
1934 Burt, Charles E. and W. L. Hoyle. Additional records of the reptiles of the central prairie region of the United States. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 37():193-216
1935 Brennan, Lawrence A. Notes on the Distribution of Amphibia and Reptilia of Ellis County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 114pp.
1935 Burt, Charles E. Further records of the ecology and distribution of amphibians and reptiles in the middle west. American Midland Naturalist 16(3):311-366
1936 Brumwell, Malcolm J. Distributional records of the reptilia and amphibians of Kansas. Privately printed, . 22pp.
County dot maps of the Kansas herpetofauna. This work has been attributed to have been written around 1933, but that may be in error. 
Hypsiglena jani was not known from Kansas until Claude W. Hibbard collected three specimens on the Stevenson Ranch in north-central Clark County (above Clark State Lake) during June 1936 (Hibbard, 1937). Brumwell plotted this locality, which leads me to believe that the 1936 would have been the earliest date this manuscript could have been written.
1937 Brennan, Lawrence A. A study of the habitat of reptiles and amphibians of Ellis County, Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 40():341-347
1939 Tihen, Joseph A. and James M. Sprague. Amphibians, reptiles, and mammals of the Meade County State Park Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 42():499-512
1941 Branson, F. and C. Deyoe. A study of snakes and lizards of Ellis County. Unpublished data, Fort Hays State University. pp.
Have been unable to locate a copy. 
Cited in Gish (1961. The Herpetofauna of Ellis County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 34pp.) among the species accounts under "other specimens reported". TWT 11 February 2020.
1944 Marr, John C. Notes on amphibians and reptiles from the central United States. American Midland Naturalist 32(2):478-490
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
The first modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table and text say 97 on p. 10) and 13 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies.
1953 Schmidt, Karl P. A Check List of North American Amphibians and Reptiles. 6th Edition. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois. 280pp.
Schmidt's first edition of his standardized checklist to North American amphibians and reptiles. Includes several specific references to Kansas in the range descriptions.
1954 Axtell, Ralph W. The systematic relationships of certain lizards in two species groups of the genus Holbrookia. Thesis. University of Texas, Austin. pp.
1956 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. Second edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (9):1-356
Hobart M. Smith's updated second edition of his first (1950) modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table says 97 on p. 10; text says 98 on p. 10) and 11 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies. The second edition has updated taxonomy, added Plestiodon laticeps, and removed Eurycea tynerensis.
1956 Axtell, Ralph W. A solution to the long neglected Holbrookia lacerata problem, and the description of two new subspecies of Holbrookia. Bulletin of the Chicago Academy of Sciences 10(11):163-179
1956 Loomis, Richard B. The chigger mites of Kansas (Acarina, Trombiculidae). University of Kansas Science Bulletin 37():1195-1443
Examined 2,628 Kansas reptiles of 48 species consisting of 27 turtles of 4 species, 1,736 lizards of 12 species and 892 snakes of 32 species for chiggers. Eleven species of chiggers were recovered from reptiles.
For amphibians, 1188 individuals of 21 species were examined. Five species of chigger mite were recovered from amphibians.
1958 Axtell, Ralph W. A monographic revision of the Iguanid genus Holbrookia. Dissertation. University of Texas, Austin. pp.
1958 Smith, Ronald E. Natural history of the Prairie Dog in Kansas. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publications (16):1-36
1960 Etheridge, Richard E. Additional notes on the lizards of the Cragin Quarry fauna. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters 45():113-117
1961 Cochran, Doris M. Type specimens of reptiles and amphibians in the United States National Museum. Bulletin of the United States National Museum (220):1-289
1962 Gish, Charles D. The Herpetofauna of Ellis County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 34pp.
1965 Clarke, Robert F. Lizards in Kansas. Kansas School Naturalist 11(4):1-16
1965 Clarke, Robert F. An ethological study of the iguanid genera Callisaurus, Cophosaurus, and Holbrookia. Emporia State Research Studies 13(4):1-66
1967 Gier, Herschel T. Vertebrates of the Flint Hills. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 70(1):51-59
1969 Tyler, Jack D. Distribution and vertebrate associates of the black-tailed prairie dog in Oklahoma. Dissertation. University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma. 85pp.
1970 Fitch, Henry S. Reproductive cycles in lizards and snakes. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (52):1-247
1972 Werth, Robert J. Lizard ecology: evidence of competition. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 75():283-300
1972 Nickerson, Max A. and R. Krager. Additional noteworthy records of Missouri amphibians and reptiles with a possible addition to the herpetofauna. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 75(3):276-277
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
Joseph T. Collins first Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Smith 1956)>
1974 Karns, Daryl, Ray E. Ashton, Jr., and Thomas Swearingen. Illustrated Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas: An Identification Manual. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History Public Education Series(2):viii + 18
1975 Rundquist, Eric M. Amphibians and Reptiles of Kingman County, Kansas. Privately Printed, Lawrence, Kansas. 3pp.
Short accounts for twenty-nine recognized amphibians and reptiles from Kingman County, Kansas. With habitat descriptions and for some species, estimates of population density.
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1977 Knight, James L. and Joseph T. Collins. The amphibians and reptiles of Cheyenne County, Kansas, Report Number 15. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 19pp.
1977 Perry, Janice. Kansas herps needed. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (18):2-3
List of Kansas amphibians and reptiles desired for the SSAR/HL meeting to be held 7-13 August 1977.
1978 Schwaner, Terry D. KHS field trip to Grant County, Kansas, 12-14 May 1978. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (25):3-4
1978 Collins, Joseph T. and Janalee P. Caldwell. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1977. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 6():70-88
1979 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1978. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 8():56-66
1979 Holman, J. Alan. Herpetofauna of the Nash local fauna (Pleistocene: Aftonian) of Kansas. Copeia 1979(4):747-749
1980 Clarke, Robert F. Herptiles and fishes of the western Arkansas River in Kansas. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 55pp.
A summary of known information on the amphibian, reptile, and fish faunas of the Arkansas River above Great Bend. The report details associated field activities for procuring fish, however no new surveys for amphibians and reptiles were undertaken. Information on herps from Finney County was provided by Michael Rush (FHSU) and thus made available before the publication of his thesis (Rush, 1981). The western Arkansas River drainage had experienced little attention by herpetologists before this study, and the species accounts reflect that paucity of data. Additionally, the report omits several older records (e.g. for Anaxyrus debilisThamnophis cyrtopsis, and Lampropeltis calligaster) from the westernmost reaches of the Arkansas River drainage in Kansas.
1980 Spencer, Dwight. Spencer, D. 1980. Ross Natural History Reservation: the first twenty years, 1959 to 1979. Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas.. 64pp.
1981 Choate, Jerry R., Charles A. Ely, Eugene D. Fleharty, and Gary K. Hulett. Biological Inventory of the Sandsage Prairie Near Holcomb, Kansas. Final Report. Sunflower Electric Cooperative, Inc., Holcomb, Kansas.. 170pp.
1981 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1980. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 10():7-19
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
Joseph T. Collins second Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1974)>
1983 Trott, Gene. Chikaskia River wildlife study. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (52):3-4
1983 Crampton, L. Herpetological collecting in Sumner County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (54):8-9
1983 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1982 . Technical Publication of the State Biological Survey of Kansas 13():9-21
1984 Secor, Stephen M. and Charles C. Carpenter. Distribution maps of Oklahoma reptiles. Oklahoma Herpetological Society Special Publication (3):1-57
1985 Platt, Dwight R. Population trends and habitat assessment of snakes and lizards in south central Kansas. Contract 80. Final report. ():37
1985 Lynch, John D. Annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of Nebraska. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Science 13():33-57
1987 Jones, S. M. and Royce E. Ballinger. Comparative life histories of Holbrookia maculata and Sceloporus undulatus in western Nebraska. Ecology 68():1828-1,838
1989 Collins, Joseph T. First Kansas herp counts held in 1989. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (77):11-
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Results of second Kansas herp count held during April-May 1990. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):10-12
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Reptiles and Amphibians of the Cimarron National Grasslands, Morton County, Kansas. U. S. Forest Service, Elkhart, Kansas. 60pp.
1992 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS annual field trip to Sheridan County State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (90):3-4
1992 Taggart, Travis W. KHS field trips. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (91):3
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
Joseph T. Collins third Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1982)>
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (97):5-14
See, 1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Additions and corrections [to the results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994]. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):4.
1995 Holman, J. Alan. Pleistocene Amphibians and Reptiles. Oxford University Press, New York. 243pp.
1996 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eighth annual KHS herp counts Held 1 April-31 May 1996. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (104):6-17
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the ninth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1997. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (108):12-17
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. A Key to Amphibians & Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 131pp.
1998 Platt, Dwight R. Monitoring population trends of snakes and lizards in Harvey County, Kansas. Final Report. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 42pp.
1998 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the tenth annual KHS herp counts for 1998, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (112):11-18
1999 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas Herpetological Society herp counts: A 10 year summary and evaluation. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (115):42962
2000 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1999. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (119):7-9
2000 Taggart, Travis W. Biogeographic analysis of the reptiles (Squamata) in Ellis County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (121):7-16
2000 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eleventh and twelfth annual KHS herpetofaunal counts for 1999-2000, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):11-16
2001 Schmidt, Curtis J. The amphibians, turtles, and reptiles of the Smoky Valley Ranch, Logan County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (124):9-11
2001 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the thirteenth annual KHS herp counts for 2001, held 1 April-30 June. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (125):13-16
2001 Kretzer, Justin E. and Jack F. Cully, Jr. Effects of Blacktailed Prairie Dogs on reptiles and amphibians in Kansas shortgrass prairie. Southwestern Naturalist 46(2):171-177
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2003 Fogell, Daniel D. A herpetofaunal inventory of Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Homestead National Monument of America, and Pipestone National Monument within the Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network. National Park Service, Washington, D.C.. 59pp.
This is the version the author submitted to the NPS. Their final publication was modified.
2003 Platt, Dwight R. Lizards and snakes (Order Squamata) of Harvey County, Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):13-20
2003 Miller, Larry L. Sumner County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):10
2004 Schmidt, Curtis J. Natural history and status of the exploited Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) in western Kansas and a herpetofaunal inventory of the Smoky Valley Ranch, Logan County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. pp.
2004 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2004 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (9):2
2004 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2004 KHS spring field trip to Logan County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (10):2-7
2004 Miller, Larry L. Sumner County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):11-12
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Addendum report to biological inventory of the sandsage prairie near Holcomb, Kansas. Sunflower Electric Cooperative, Hays, Kansas. 31pp.
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Where have all the Holbrookia gone?. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (19):10
2007 Taggart, Travis W., Joseph T. Collins, and Curtis J. Schmidt. Estimates of amphibian, reptile, and turtle mortality if Phostoxin is applied to 10,000 acres of prairie dog burrows in Logan County, Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. 5pp.
2007 Taggart, Travis W. A biological inventory of the Sunflower Electric Site near Holcomb, Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology 23():11-16
2009 Murrow, Daniel G. KHS 2009 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (29):42769
2009 Taggart, Travis W. Geographic distribution. Holbrookia maculata (Lesser Earless Lizard). Journal of Kansas Herpetology (29):7
2009 Murrow, Daniel G. Results of the KHS 2009 Spring field trip . Journal of Kansas Herpetology (30):2-6
2010 Miller, Larry L. Investigation of the Checkered Garter Snake in Kansas with notes on other Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles encountered. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 31pp.
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
Joseph T. Collins fourth Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1993)>
2010 Murrow, Daniel G. Kansas Herpetological Society spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (33):2-3
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2011 Taggart, Travis W. and Daniel Murrow. KHS to conduct summer field trip to western Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (38):5
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2012 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada: Second Edition, Revised and Updated. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 152pp.
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Summer Field Trip to Meade County State Park. Collinsorum 2(3/4):3
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS Spring Field Trip to Barber County Collinsorum 3(2-4):11
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS summer field trip to Morton County and adjacent Colorado, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Collinsorum 3(2-4):12
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Recent scientific and standard English name changes effecting the Kansas herpetofauna. Collinsorum 3(2-4):9-10
2015 Rohweder, Megan R. Kansas Wildlife Action Plan. Ecological Services Section, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism in cooperation with the Kansas Biological Survey. 176pp.
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2017 Taggart, Travis W. and J. Daren Riedle. A Pocket Guide to Kansas Amphibians, Turtles and Lizards. Great Plains Nature Center, Wichita, Kansas. 69pp.
2017 Crother, Brian I. (editor) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding. Eighth edition. Herpetological Circulars (43):102
2018 Rogers, Sean. An aerial perspective: Using unmanned aerial systems to predict presence of Lesser Earless Lizards (Holbrookia maculata). Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 72pp.
2019 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Third Edition. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 192pp.
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Hamilton County: KHS-2020-10. Collinsorum 9(3):13
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Morton County: KHS-2020-12. Collinsorum 9(3):13
2021 Taggart, Megan M. and Travis W. Taggart. Herp Count: Seward County: KHS-2020-27. Collinsorum 9(3):15
2021 Locklear, James H. The Sandsage Prairie ecological system: Biodiversity hotspot for the Great Plains. Natural Areas Journal 41(1):64-74
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University