Reconstruction of Spinoaequalis schultzei (KUVP 12484) from Hamilton Quarry, Greenwood County, Kansas. Figure 1 from the original description (deBraga and Reisz, 1995). Shaded area represents missing data.
Anterior portion of the snout of Spinoaequalis schultzei (KUVP 12484) from Hamilton Quarry, Greenwood County, Kansas. Figure 2 from the original description (deBraga and Reisz, 1995).
Ventral aspect of skeleton minus caudal region of Spinoaequalis schultzei (KUVP 12484) from Hamilton Quarry, Greenwood County, Kansas. Figure 3 from the original description (deBraga and Reisz, 1995).
Hindlimb and caudal region of Spinoaequalis schultzei (KUVP 12484) from Hamilton Quarry, Greenwood County, Kansas. Figure 4 from the original description (deBraga and Reisz, 1995).
Magnification of skull region of Spinoaequalis schultzei (KUVP 12484) from Hamilton Quarry, Greenwood County, Kansas. Figure 5 from the original description (deBraga and Reisz, 1995).
Magnification of skull region of Spinoaequalis schultzei (KUVP 12484) from Hamilton Quarry, Greenwood County, Kansas. Figure 5 from the original description (deBraga and Reisz, 1995).
REPTILIA (Reptiles) ARAEOSCELIDA (Earliest Diapsid Reptiles) PETROLACOSAURIDAE ()

Schultze's Equal-length Diapsid
Spinoaequalis schultzei deBraga and Reisz 1995


Conservation Status:

Extinct





Diagnosis:
A small diapsid reptile distinguished by the following autapomorphies: ventral process of squamosal narrow; trunk ribs holocephalic; caudal neural spines distal to eleventh caudal vertebra elongate, at least 50 percent. taller than those of proximal caudals; haemal spines are equal in length to the caudal neural spines of same vertebrae; haemal spines increase in length posteriorly: haemal spines with slight distal expansion; caudal centra wiLh a length to height ratio approaching I: I; caudal neural arches saddle-shaped; transverse processes absent from caudal vertebrae: interclavicle long approaching the length of eight dorsal vertebrae; and acetabulum sub-circular in outline.

Distribution:
Known only from the type locality: Calhoun Shale, Shawnee Group. Virgilian Series (Stephanian of Europe). Upper Pennsylvanian; Hamilton Quarry near Hamilton, Greenwood County, Kansas.
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Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 1
    Records 
  • 1
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 0
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Hamilton (1);

Natural History:


Remarks:
From the Latin spiina (spine) and aequalis (symmetry) referring to the equal length of caudal neural and haemal spines; specific designation in honor of Dr Hans-Peter Schultz,. in recognition of his work on Palaeozoic vertebrates.

Bibliography:
1988 Reisz, R. R. Two Small Reptiles from a Late Pennsylvanian Quarry near Hamilton, Kansas. Pages 189-194 in Guidebook Series 6: Regional Geology and Paleontology of Upper Paleozoic Hamilton Quarry Area in Southeastern Kansas. Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, Kansas. pp.
1988 Reisz, R. R. Two Small Reptiles from a Late Pennsylvanian Quarry near Hamilton, Kansas. Pages 189-194 in Guidebook Series 6: Regional Geology and Paleontology of Upper Paleozoic Hamilton Quarry Area in Southeastern Kansas. Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, Kansas. pp.
1995 deBraga, Michael and Robert R. Reisz. A new diapsid reptile from the uppermost Carboniferous (Stephanian) of Kansas. Palaeontology 38(1):199-212
Description of Spinoaequalis schultzei from near Garnett, Kansas.
2016 McElroy, Aleksander P. Fauna and depositional environment of a Late Plennsylvaninan vertebrate fossil locality in southeastern Kansas. Thesis. Emporia State Univeristy, Emporia, Kansas. 72pp.
Pennsylvanian fossils included amphibians and reptiles.
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University