A juvenile Northern Map Turtle. Image © Suzanne L. Collins, CNAH.
A adult female (left) and an adult male (right) Northern Map Turtle basking on a log in Shoal Creek, Cherokee County. © Jenn Rader.
REPTILIA (Reptiles) TESTUDINES (Turtles) EMYDIDAE (Box and Basking Turtles)

Northern Map Turtle
Graptemys geographica (LeSueur 1817)
grăp-tĕm-ēz — gē-ō-gră-fĭ-kă


Conservation Status:

State: Kansas Threatened Species

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S2 - Imperiled
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: Appendix III
Diagnosis:
The semiaquatic Northern Map Turtle is characterized by a short tail, a rigid upper and lower shell, an upper shell with a roughly jagged rear edge, a small yellow spot behind each eye, and dark-colored seams between the large scutes on the lower shell. The upper shell is dull olive-gray with yellowish lines and circles. The lower shell is gray and lacks a pattern, but the seams between each scute are darker than the lower shell color. The head, limbs, and tail are olive or brownish with yellow stripes. Males have longer tails than females. Females have broader heads and reach a much larger size than males.
Adults are normally 90-253 mm (3½-10 inches) in carapace length. The largest specimen from Kansas is a female (KU Color Slide 8872) from Osage County with a carapace length of 226 mm (8‌7⁄8 inches) collected by Lenn Shipman and Warren Voorhees on 3 July 1990. The maximum carapace length throughout the range is 269.9 mm (10‌5⁄8 inches) (Powell et al., 2016).

Distribution:
The Northern Map turtle is known from the Marais des Cygnes, Verdigris, and Caney drainage systems in eastern Kansas. This species inhabits slow-moving stretches and backwaters of rivers, streams, and lakes.
Additional records (both from 1911) exist for Montgomery (KU 3267) and Wilson (KU 3285) but are too imprecise to plot. These records are mapped in Collins (1993).
(,   Museum Voucher) (,   Observation) (,   Literature Record) (,   iNat Record), (  Fossil)
Open icons are questionable records; Click on a marker to view details.
Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 267
    Records 
  • 167
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 100
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Allen (6); Anderson (6); Bourbon (78); Chautauqua (1); Cherokee (19); Coffey (11); Ellsworth (1); Franklin (7); Johnson (23); Linn (6); Lyon (32); Miami (3); Montgomery (1); Osage (60); Unknown (3); Wabaunsee (8); Wilson (2);

Fossil History:
Fossils from the Kanopolis Local Fauna of Ellsworth County (Pleistocene: Rancholabrean I) (Preston 1979, Holman 1972, Holman 1984; Holman 1995) are assignable to this taxon. This record is outside the currently known distribution of this species.

Natural History:
David Edds and his students at Emporia State University studied this species in Kansas (Edds et al., 1990; Edds, 1991), and much of the information known about this turtle in Kansas is based on their work.
This species prefers slow-moving or still bodies of water ranging in size from small stream to rivers, including river oxbows and lakes. Clarke (1953) found a specimen •in a small stream in Osage County. Edds (1991) reported ten of these turtles in streams 15 to 60 feet wide with shorelines shaded by trees; little vegetation and few basking sites were evident.
The Northern Map Turtle is probably active from April to October; it has definitely been documented in Kansas from 24 June to 6 October. It becomes less active during the winter but may not actually burrow in the mud as do some of the other semiaquatic turtles.
Northern Map Turtles spend most of the day basking and sleeping in the sun on logs or other suitable perches, evidently foraging for food at twilight and after dark. They are gregarious, congregating in large numbers at optimal sites, and are extremely wary when approached.
This shy turtle may mate twice each season but generally initiates breeding in the spring. Nothing is known of courtship in this species in Kansas. Females dig nests from May to July along the water's edge in soft soil or sand but normally not on beaches. Each female lays from 10- 16 elongate dull white eggs. If they are laid in early spring, hatching will occur in early fall. Eggs laid during the summer or fall may not hatch until the following spring.
The Northern Map Turtle feeds on crayfishes and freshwater mussels but apparently does not prey on fishes (Collins, 1993).

Occurrence Activity:
Number of Unique Obervations (=days): 63; Range: 03 Mar to 21 Dec
Remarks:
First reported from Kansas by Cragin (1880) from specimens observed around Ottawa, Franklin County. Though Burt (1933) mentioned "A small turtle (K.S.C. 374), which apparently belongs to this species, was secured near Manhattan, Riley County, by J. B. Norton, in July, 1897.", this specimen is more likely Graptemys ouachitensis/pseudogeographica. The oldest extant specimens known from Kansas were all collected in 1911 are from Montgomery County (KU 3267; Verdigris River; July), Franklin County (KU 3225, 3265; Marais des Cygnes River, Ottawa, Franklin County), and Wilson County (KU 3285; no other locality data).
Formerly considered extirpated in Kansas (Capron, 1985). Edds (1990, 1991) discovered six new localities in the Marais des Cygnes drainage. The Northern Map Turtle is shy and retiring, usually avoiding the main stem of Kansas' larger rivers, in favor of smaller tributaries with denser canopies.
Recent observations from Chautauqua and Wilson counties help corroborate specimens from the Verdigris River drainage mapped by Collins (1993). Voucher specimens are desirable from this area, should they ever become available.
There is little evidence to suggest that populations have changed much over the past 50 years. However, because it is known from so few localities, those sites should be monitored regularly and new sites should be surveyed.
Two recent observations in Johnson County along Wolf Creek and the Blue River (~2 miles apart) warrant further investigation.
Listed as a Kansas Threatened species in 1993. No recovery plan exists for this species. Edds (1991) recommended this species be designated endangered in Kansas because of water pollution, habitat destruction, and a decline in the state's freshwater mussel populations.
As defined by Kansas Administrative Regulations, critical habitats include those areas documented as currently supporting self-sustaining population(s) of any threatened or endangered species of wildlife as well as those areas determined by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism to be essential for the conservation of any threatened or endangered species of wildlife
Currently, the following areas are designated critical for Northern Map Turtles:
(1) The main stem of the Marmaton River from Moran, Allen County (Sec. 36-T24S-R20E) to the Kansas/Missouri border in Bourbon County (Sec. 24-T25S-R25E).
(2) The main stem of Cedar Creek in Anderson County from its point of entry into Sec. 1-T22S-R18E to its confluence with Pottawatomie Creek (Sec. 1-T20S-R19E).
(3) The main stem of the South Fork of Pottawatomie Creek in Anderson County from its point of entry into Sec. 27-T21S-R20E to the confluence with Pottawatomie Creek (Sec. 24- T19S-R20E).
(4) The main stem of the West Fork of Tauy Creek in Franklin County from the Douglas/Franklin County border (Sec. 23-T15S-R19E) to the confluence with Ottawa Creek (Sec. 28-T16S-R20E).
(5) The main stem of Ottawa Creek in Franklin County from the confluence of the West Fork of Tauy Creek (Sec. 23-T15S-R19E) to the confluence with the Marais des Cygnes River (Sec. 11-T17S-R20E).
(6) The main stem of Long Creek in Osage County from the Osage/Coffey County border (Sec. 36-T18S-R15E) to the confluence of the Marais des Cygnes River (Sec. 2-T18S-R16E).
(7) The main stem of Frog Creek in Osage County from the Osage/Coffey County border (Sec. 34-T18S-R15E) to the confluence with Long Creek (Sec. 30-T18S-R16E).
(8) The main stem of the Little Osage River in Bourbon County from the Bourbon/Allen County border (Sec. 36-T23S-R21E) to the Kansas/Missouri border (Sec. 1-T24S-R25E).
(9) The main stem of Appanoose Creek in Franklin County from the Osage/Franklin border (Sec. 23-T15S-R17E) to the confluence with the Marais des Cygnes River (Sec. 32-T16S-R19E).
Based on a captive specimen, Snider and Bowler (1992) reported a maximum longevity for this turtle of eighteen years and 21 days.

Bibliography:
1857 Agassiz, Louis. Contributions to the Natural History of the United States of America. Volume 1. Little, Brown & Company, Boston, Massachusets. 452pp.
Original description of Cistudo triunguis p. 445.
Discusses the regional faunas and includes Kansas in the "Western Fauna" pp. 450-451, with such characteristic species as Apalone mutica, Apalone spinifera, Chelydra serpentina, Chrysemys picta, Graptemys geographica, Graptemys pseudogeographica, Kinosternon subrubrumPseudemys concinna, Sternotherus odoratus, and Trachemys scripta, though none are listed as definitively occurring in Kansas.
1880 Cragin, Francis W. A preliminary catalogue of Kansas reptiles and batrachians Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 7():112-123
Also listed the Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea) [=Ophibolus doliatus var. coccineus] and Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) [=Spelerpes ruber] from Kansas.
1911 Hurter, Julius. Herpetology of Missouri. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 20(5):59-274
1916 Householder, Victor H. The Lizards and Turtles of Kansas with Notes on Their Distribution and Habitat. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 100pp.
1928 Ortenburger, Arthur I. The whip snakes and racers: Genera Masticophis and Coluber. Memiors of the University of Michigan Museum (1):1-247
1929 White, Theodore E. The osteology of the recent turtles of central North America. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 309pp.
1933 Burt, Charles E. Some distributional and ecological records of Kansas reptiles. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 26():186-208
1936 Brumwell, Malcolm J. Distributional records of the reptilia and amphibians of Kansas. Privately printed, . 22pp.
County dot maps of the Kansas herpetofauna. This work has been attributed to have been written around 1933, but that may be in error. 
Hypsiglena jani was not known from Kansas until Claude W. Hibbard collected three specimens on the Stevenson Ranch in north-central Clark County (above Clark State Lake) during June 1936 (Hibbard, 1937). Brumwell plotted this locality, which leads me to believe that the 1936 would have been the earliest date this manuscript could have been written.
1947 Hall, Henry H. and Hobart M. Smith. Selected records of reptiles and amphibians from southeastern Kansas Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 49(4):447-454
Report on certain Kansas specimens housed in the collection at what is now Pittsburg State University. Included are several species of dubious status today, including Cryptobranchus alleganiensis from the Neosho and Spring rivers (the only specimens from those significant drainages ever documented), Ambystoma maculatum from just north of Pittsburg, Crawford County, Heterodon nasicus from Crawford County, Opheodrys vernalis from Crawford County, Sonora episcopa from Crawford County, Agkistrodon piscivorus from Cherokee County, Crotalus atrox from Crawford County, and Crotalus viridis from Crawford County. They report several significant range extensions including Kinosternon flavescens from Turkey Creek in southeast Cherokee County, Graptemys geographica from just north of Pittsburg, Crotaphytus collaris from near Columbus, Cherokee County, Sceloporus consobrinus from just north of Pittsburg, Phrynosoma cornutum from Cherokee and Crawford counties, Heterodon platirhinos from Cherokee and Crawford counties, Haldea striatula from Crawford County, Sistrurus tergeminus from Crawford County, and a 402 lb Macrochelys temminckii in Cherokee County from just east of Chetopa (Labette County). They allude to the potential for Anaxyrus fowleri to occur in southeast Kansas and for native populations of Crotalus atrox in south central Kansas (in part from the disclosure that John R. Breukelman [then of ESU] had obtained three specimens in Woods County Oklahoma, 3/4 of a mile south of the Kansas line). None of the specimens the paper was based on, exist today.
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
The first modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table and text say 97 on p. 10) and 13 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies.
1953 Schmidt, Karl P. A Check List of North American Amphibians and Reptiles. 6th Edition. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois. 280pp.
Schmidt's first edition of his standardized checklist to North American amphibians and reptiles. Includes several specific references to Kansas in the range descriptions.
1956 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. Second edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (9):1-356
Hobart M. Smith's updated second edition of his first (1950) modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table says 97 on p. 10; text says 98 on p. 10) and 11 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies. The second edition has updated taxonomy, added Plestiodon laticeps, and removed Eurycea tynerensis.
1956 Clarke, Robert F. Turtles in Kansas. Kansas School Naturalist 2(4):1-15
1956 Clarke, Robert F. Identification of Kansas turtles. Kansas School Naturalist 2(4):1-3
1967 Choate, Jerry R. Wildlife in the Wakarusa Watershed of Northeastern Kansas. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 46pp.
1967 Gier, Herschel T. Vertebrates of the Flint Hills. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 70(1):51-59
1972 Holman, J. Alan. Herpetofauna of the Kanopolis local fauna (Pleistocene: Yarmouth) of Kansas. Michigan Academic 5():87-98
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
Joseph T. Collins first Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Smith 1956)>
1974 Karns, Daryl, Ray E. Ashton, Jr., and Thomas Swearingen. Illustrated Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas: An Identification Manual. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History Public Education Series(2):viii + 18
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Perry, Jan. Field trip to southeast Kansas planned. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (12):1
1978 Hibbard, Claude W.; Richard J. Zakrzewski, Ralph E. Eshelman, Gordon Edmund, Clayton D. Griggs, and Caroline Griggs. Mammals from the Kanopolis Local Fauna, Pleistocene (Yarmouth) of Ellsworth County, Kansas. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, The University of Michigan 25(2):11-44
1979 Martin, Larry D. Survey of fossil vertebrates from east-central Kansas: Kansas River bank stabilization study. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. 55pp.
1979 Preston, Robert E. Late Pleistocene cold-blooded vertebrate faunas from the mid-continental United States, I. Reptilia: Testudines, Crocodilia. University of Michigan Museum of Palenontology, Papers on Paleontology. (19):1-53.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
Joseph T. Collins second Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1974)>
1984 Brown, Kenneth L. Pomona: A plains village variant in eastern Kansas and western Missouri. Dissertation. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 519pp.
1984 Secor, Stephen M. and Charles C. Carpenter. Distribution maps of Oklahoma reptiles. Oklahoma Herpetological Society Special Publication (3):1-57
1988 Busby, William H. The Kansas Natural Heritage Program: Taking stock of Kansas' natural heritage. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (71):9-12
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1990 Edds, David, Warren Voorhees, Judy Schnell and Lenn Shipman. Common Map Turtle rediscovered in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (82):12
1990 McCoy, Clarence J., Jr. and Richard C. Vogt. Graptemys geographica. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (484):1-7
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Edds, David R. Conservation status of the Common Map Turtle in Kansas. Agency Contract # 259.  ():45
1991 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1990. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (83):7-13
1991 Voorhees, William, J. Schnell, and David Edds. Bait preferences of semiaquatic turtles in southeast Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (85):14-13
1992 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas endangered, threatened, and SINC species. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (91):
1992 Taggart, Travis W. KHS field trips. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (91):3
1993 Freeman, Craig C. and William H. Busby. A survey for endangered and threatened species on the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant, Johnson County, Kansas. Report No. 54. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 115pp.
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
Joseph T. Collins third Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1982)>
1993 Kirkpatrick, D. Map turtles of the United States. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (November-December):6-17
1994 McCoy, Clarence J., Jr. and Richard C. Vogt. Graptemys. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (584):1-3
1994 Fuselier, Linda, and David Edds. Habitat partitioning among three sympatric species of map turtles, genus Graptemys. Journal of Herpetology 28(2):154-158
1994 Dloogatch , Michael A. (Editor) Herpetology 1994 Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 29(12):282-283
Not on the paper by Fuselier and Edds (1994) in Journal of Herpetology on Kansas map turtles.
1995 Holman, J. Alan. Pleistocene Amphibians and Reptiles. Oxford University Press, New York. 243pp.
1996 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eighth annual KHS herp counts Held 1 April-31 May 1996. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (104):6-17
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. A Key to Amphibians & Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 131pp.
1998 Gamble, Jerre. Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartford, Kansas. 91pp.
1999 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas Herpetological Society herp counts: A 10 year summary and evaluation. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (115):42962
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2005 Browne, Constance L. and Stephen J. Hecnar. Capture success of Northern Map Turtles (Graptemys geographica) and other turtle species in basking vs. baited hoop traps. Herpetological Review 36(2):145-147
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2008 Industrial Economics, Incorporated. Cherokee County: Restoration Plan / Environmental Assessment. Prepared for: US Department of the Interior, US Fish and Wildlife Service. Industrial Economics, Incorporated, Cambridge, MA. 138pp.
2008 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2008 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (25):2-3
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
Joseph T. Collins fourth Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1993)>
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2012 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada: Second Edition, Revised and Updated. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 152pp.
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Recent scientific and standard English name changes effecting the Kansas herpetofauna. Collinsorum 3(2-4):9-10
2014 Lindeman, Peter V. Surveys of basking turtles in the rivers of northeastern Oklahoma, with emphasis on Graptemys geographica (Common Map Turtle). Proceedings of the Oklahoma Academy of Science 94():1-9
2015 Rohweder, Megan R. Kansas Wildlife Action Plan. Ecological Services Section, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism in cooperation with the Kansas Biological Survey. 176pp.
2016 Lindeman, Peter V. The Map Turtle and Sawback Atlas: Ecology, Evolution, Distribution, and Conservation. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman. 488pp.
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2017 Taggart, Travis W. and J. Daren Riedle. A Pocket Guide to Kansas Amphibians, Turtles and Lizards. Great Plains Nature Center, Wichita, Kansas. 69pp.
2017 Crother, Brian I. (editor) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding. Eighth edition. Herpetological Circulars (43):102
2017 Praschag, Peter, Flora Ihlow, Morris Flecks, Melita Vamberger, and Uwe Fritz. Diversity of North American map and sawback turtles (Testudines: Emydidae: Graptemys). Zoologica Scripta 46():675-682
2018 Petersen, Christopher E., Robert E. Lovich, and Sarah Stallings. Amphibians and reptiles of  United States Department of Defense installations. Herpetological Conservation and Biology 13(3):652–661
2019 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Third Edition. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 192pp.
2020 Mahr, Michael S. Distributions and statuses of map turtles (Graptemys sp.) in Kansas. Thesis. Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas.. 131pp.
2020 Daniel, Richard E. and Brian S. Edmond. Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2019. Privately printed, Columbia, Missouri. 86pp.
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
2020 Rader, Jennifer. Southeast Kansas Nature Center. Kansas Wildlife and Parks Magazine July-August():38-41
2021 Rhodin, Anders G. J., John B. Iverson, Roger Bour, Uwe Fritz, Arthur Georges, H. Bradley Shaffer, and Peter Paul van Dijk. Turtles and tortoises of the world during the rise and global spread of humanity: First checklist and review of extinct pleistocene and holocene chelonians. Chelonian Research Monographs (8):1-472
2021 Autz, Justin J., Alexis F. L. A. Powell, Jennifer L. Buchanan, Michael S. Hahr, Lynnette M. Sievert, David R. Edds, and J. Daren Riedle. Geographic distribution: Necturus maculosus; Kansas. Herpetological Review 52(1):74-75
2021 Powell, Alexis F. L. A., Michael S. Mahr, Jennifer L. Buchanan, and Justin Autz. New records of the Northern Map Turtle (Graptemys geographica) redefine its known distribution and abundance in Kansas, USA. Herpetological Review 52(4):737–742
2022 Powell, Alexis F. L. A. and Greg Sievert. New distributional records of turtles in eastern Kansas and western Missouri, USA. Herpetological Review 53(2):265–271
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University