Adult Gray Treefrog (complex) from Allen County. Image by Lisa Wehrly.
Adult male (left) and female Gray Treefrog complex in amplexus from Wilson County. Image © Travis W. Taggart
A tadpole of Hyla chrysoscelis/versicolor. Image © Altig et al. (2006).
An adult from Sedgwick County, Kansas. Photograph by Carl B. Davis ©.
AMPHIBIA (Amphibians) ANURA (Frogs) HYLIDAE (Treefrogs and Allies)

Cope's Gray Treefrog/Gray Treefrog complex
Hyla chrysoscelis/versicolor Cope 1880/LeConte 1825
hī-lă — crī-sôs-ē'-lĭs/vĕr-sĭ'-kələr


Conservation Status:

State: None

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S5 - Secure
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None
Diagnosis:
The Cope's Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) and Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) are putative members of a cryptic, diploid-tetraploid species complex. Call differences were initially used to distinguish the two forms (Noble and Hassler, 1936) and this was further supported by the discovery of congruent ploidy structure (Wasserman, 1970). Recent studies (Ptacek 1994 through Bogart 2020 and Booker et al. 2022) have illustrated that the recognition of two species based solely on their call and ploidy may not be valid.
Cope's and Gray Treefrogs are characterized by moist skin, a round snout, conspicuously enlarged pads on the toes of both front and hind feet, and a distinct color. These are the only amphibians in Kansas that can change their color completely to blend better with their habitat. The head, body, and limbs vary from bright green to tan or light gray. The green color phase is normally uniform with no pattern, but the light gray phase may have darker blotches and spots on the back, head, and limbs. These frogs have a distinct white spot on the upper lip directly below the eye. The inside and underside of the rear limbs are bright yellow-orange. The belly is white. Females have a greater SVL length and, during the breeding season, heavier bodies than males.
Adults normally reach 32-58 mm (1¼- 2¼ inches) in snout-vent length. The largest Kansas specimen is a female Hyla chrysoscelis (FHSM 8430) from Miami County with a snout-vent length of 54 mm  (2­1⁄10 inches) collected by Keith Coleman on 20 March 2004. The maximum length throughout the range is 62 mm (2­7⁄16 inches) (Powell et al. 2016).

Distribution:
Found throughout the forested regions of the eastern third of Kansas. An isolated record exists at in Pratt County and may represent an accidental introduction at the state fish hatchery.
The tetraploid Gray Treefrog is morphologically indistinguishable from the diploid Cope’s Gray Treefrog and both species occupy similar ranges, however, the Cope’s Gray Treefrog is more widely distributed in Kansas. Gray Treefrogs are known from the Verdigris, Marias des Cygnes, and Kansas River drainages in Kansas.
Collins and Hillis (1985) and Hillis et al. (1987) analyzed the chromosomes of both species throughout Kansas. They found H. chrysoscelis throughout the eastern third of Kansas. H. versicolor was found in the Cross Timbers, lower Neosho River basin, the Marais des Cygnes, and the lower Kansas river basins. They determined the specific status for the following specimens:
Hyla chrysoscelis: Chase Co.: KU 203673; Chautauqua Co.: KU 203710; Cherokee Co.: KU 33490, 203665-68, 203706-07, 203720-22; Coffey Co.: KU 203705; Crawford Co.: KU 203718-19; Douglas Co.: KU 16371, 16373-381, 203995-96, 203991-92, 203993-94, 203676- 79, 203712-714; Elk Co.: KU 203711; Franklin Co.: KU 203669-671, 204038; Greenwood Co.: KU 203701; Jackson Co.: KU 203690-94; Jefferson Co.: KU 17398; Johnson Co.: KU 203723-24; Leavenworth Co.: KU 21145; Marshall Co.: KU 49182-84; Miami Co.: KU 203672, 204037; Montgomery Co.: KU 203708-09; Neosho Co.: KU 203715-17; Osage Co.: KU 17681, 203689; Pottawatomie Co.: KU 203674-75; Riley Co.: KU 203698-700; Shawnee Co.: KU 203688; Wabaunsee Co.: KU 203695-97; Wilson Co.: KU 203680-87; Woodson Co.: KU 203702-04
Hyla versicolor: Atchison Co.: KU 203740-41; Bourbon Co.: KU 28672; Cherokee Co.: KU 28671, 31099, 203746; Douglas Co.: KU 8122, 22013, 203745; Elk Co.: KU 203742-44; Franklin Co.: KU 203735; Greenwood Co.: KU 22931; Jefferson Co.: KU 203732-34; Miami Co.: KU 21833, 22112, 203736-39.
There is anecdotal evidence that the species complex range has been expanding in Kansas (Collins et al. 2010). Over the past 50 years, specimens have been found increasingly westward along riparian corridors where they weren't found previously.
(,   Museum Voucher) (,   Observation) (,   Literature Record) (,   iNat Record), (  Fossil)
Open icons are questionable records; Click on a marker to view details.
Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 2,786
    Records 
  • 1,445
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 1,341
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Allen (23); Anderson (1); Atchison (23); Bourbon (19); Brown (29); Butler (47); Chase (33); Chautauqua (12); Cherokee (590); Clay (11); Cloud (1); Coffey (101); Cowley (12); Crawford (290); Dickinson (8); Doniphan (22); Douglas (336); Elk (8); Ellis (1); Ellsworth (1); Finney (1); Franklin (34); Geary (8); Greenwood (62); Harper (3); Harvey (1); Jackson (59); Jefferson (66); Johnson (66); Labette (41); Leavenworth (90); Linn (83); Lyon (10); Marshall (11); McPherson (1); Miami (71); Mitchell (1); Montgomery (58); Morris (5); Nemaha (12); Neosho (17); Osage (37); Ottawa (7); Pottawatomie (118); Pratt (1); Reno (1); Republic (2); Riley (78); Saline (8); Sedgwick (78); Shawnee (36); Sumner (22); Unknown (3); Wabaunsee (52); Washington (13); Wilson (23); Woodson (24); Wyandotte (15);

Fossil History:
Fossils from the Kanopolis Local Fauna of Ellsworth County (Pleistocene: Rancholabrean I) (Preston 1979, Holman 1972, Holman 1984; Holman 1995) are assignable to this taxon. Ellsworth County is outside the currently known range of this species.

Natural History:
According to Fitch (1958), in northeastern Kansas Gray Treefrogs inhabit the trees and low shrubs of woodland and woodland edge areas and are more arboreal than other frogs.
Their enlarged adhesive toe pads allow them to cling to smooth leaf surfaces. They appear to be very tolerant of high temperatures and frequently call from treetop perches on warm, humid summer nights. Fitch (l 956) further reported Gray Treefrogs to be active during the summer when humidity was high. He found specimens in small holes and niches in sun-heated limestone rocks, but the frogs maintained body temperatures lower than the rocks. During the summer, he observed these frogs on low-hanging branches in trees, perched in direct sunlight in no apparent discomfort, their bodies reaching temperatures as high as 90°F. In Osage County, Clarke (1958) observed activity in these treefrogs from 12 May to 28 July at an air temperature range of 60-88°F. Male Gray Treefrogs are territorial and maintain their territories by using encounter calls and fighting when another frog approaches too closely.
Gray Treefrogs normally breed from April to July. Caldwell and Glass (1976) reported choruses of these treefrogs from May to July at a small pond in Woodson County. Air temperatures of 60°F or above stimulated males to begin chorusing and to approach a suitable breeding site. Heinrich and Kaufman (1985) reported two males calling on 10 June on the Konza Prairie. Collins and Hillis (1985) and Hillis et al. (1987) recorded Kansas choruses of Hyla chrysoscelis from 11 April to 26 June, and of H. versicolor from 11 April to 22 June.
These amphibians breed in permanent, semi-permanent, or temporary pools with mud bottoms and weedy vegetation in or near woodlands. The male mounts a female in the water, clasping her behind her forelegs with his front limbs. A single female may lay from 700 to 3,800 eggs (Steven Roble, pers. com, 1980; Collins, 1993) in small floating masses. The eggs hatch in four or five days and the free-swimming tadpoles metamorphose within two months. The young frogs evidently remain on or near the ground within proximity of the breeding site during the first season following metamorphosis (Roble, 1979).
Collins and Hillis (1985) and Hillis et al. (1987) found few apparent differences in breeding site selection in Kansas between the two Gray Treefrogs; indeed, both species were taken at the same breeding site on the same date in Douglas, Elk, and Franklin counties. They noted, however, that Hyla versicolor was apparently restricted to breeding sites within heavily forested areas, whereas H. chrysoscelis used a wider variety of sites, whether forested or not. Breeding areas varied from temporary flooded ditches to rain pools in cultivated fields to permanent ponds and ranged in depth from 0.1-2.4 meters (few inches to eight feet). Only a few sites contained fish predators, and none was more than 152.4 meters (500 feet) from forest.
Recently, studies elsewhere have shown that when these two species bred at the same site, male H. chrysoscelis sat and called closer to the ground whereas H. versicolor chorused from more elevated perches; when allopatric at breeding localities, both species called from a wider range of elevations.
A specimen from Pottawatomie County contained a small cricket (Hartman 1906). These frogs eat both terrestrial and flying insects.

Occurrence Activity:
Number of Unique Obervations (=days): 206; Range: 17 Feb to 10 Nov
Chorusing:

Audio recording by Keith Coleman.

Chorusing Phenology: The black outlined dots denote the Julian date (day of the year; 1 January = 1 to 31 December = 365) an observation was made. The thin red line depicts the range of dates between the beginning of the first, and end of the fourth quartile (excluding outliers; Tukey method). The thick light blue bar represents the second and third quartile (interquartile range; the middle 50% of all observations). Only one observation per Julian date is included in the graphs; so a date with multiple observations carries the same weight as a date with only one observation. The vertical bars correspond to the 12 months of the year; January through December.
Number of Unique Obervations: 729; Range: 16 Mar to 23 Jul; Interquartile range: 29 Apr to 19 Jun;

Remarks:
First reported in Kansas by Cragin, (1880) based on a specimen from "Kansas" in the Cambridge Museum of Comparative Zoology. The earliest existing specimen (MVZ 43356) was collected in May of 1909 at Lawrence (Douglas County).
A complex of two separate, yet externally indistinguishable, species. For this reason, they are included in the same account, however, it should be noted that this arrangement should not minimize their recognition as independent evolutionary entities. Diploid Hyla chrysoscelis and tetraploid H. versicolor are cryptic species that range across much of eastern North America (Bogart, 1980; Powell, et al. 2016). The two species cannot be distinguished by morphology, but they have distinctly different calls (pulse rate at the same temperature) (Blair, 1958; Johnson, 1966; Gerhardt, 1974) that was noted prior to their recognition as different species (Wasserman, 1970; Bogart and Wasserman, 1972). They also differ in cell volume, nucleolar organizing regions (NOR's) (Keller, 2000), and as stated, karyotype. [Interestingly, Wasserman (1970) never correlated the trill rate with the karyotype. His study frogs (all considered H. versicolor) were from Alpine, New Jersey (in the range of what we currently consider H. versicolor, and just outside the range of H. chrysoscelis) and Bastrop, Texas (in the range of what we currently consider H. chrysoscelis, and just outside the range of H. versicolor). Later studies cite Wasserman (1970) as denoting that two chromosomal forms existed and associated them with the trill rate of their call, when in fact Wasserman never makes that connection. He states "It therefore appears likely that there are several tetraploid populations of this species [H. versicolor] or that the species in entirely tetraploid. It may be that the ploidy level and call type within this complex do not actually correlate.]
Tetraploid H. versicolor is the result of recurrent hybrid origins with a complex reticulate evolutionary history. H. versicolor is likely polyphyletic. Ptacek et al., (1994), analyzed mitochondrial sequences to infer that H. versicolor arose at least three times, twice from H. chrysoscelis and once from an unknown maternal ancestor.
Holloway et al. (2006), using mitochondrial and nuclear markers, suggested that H. versicolor arose multiple times from H. chrysoscelis and two other extinct lineages. They further report that parallel evolution of advertisement calls in tetraploid lineages has allowed these lineages to interbreed (exclusive of the diploid lineages), resulting in a single sexually interacting polyploid species (H. versicolor) despite the separate origins of polyploids from different diploids.
Tetraploid cells have approximately twice the volume of diploid cells and may be a mechanism for mate recognition among different tetraploid lineages. Keller and Gerhardt (2001) found that polyploidization (and the concomitant increased cell size) may lead to a predictable and consistent change in the advertisement call, which would result in automatic isolation of the tetraploids from the diploids but identification of other (even more distantly related) tetraploids as possible mates. Tucker and Gerhardt (2011) followed by demonstrating that artificially produced autotriploid females of the diploid species (Hyla chrysoscelis) show a shift in pulse rate preference in the direction of the pulse rate produced by males of the tetraploid species (Hyla versicolor). This process helps to explain why tetraploid lineages with different origins have similar advertisement calls and freely interbreed.
Rather than tetraploidy arising anew from diploid ancestors, the available mitochondrial data would also support the ‘triploid bridge hypothesis' (Ralin and Selander, 1979; Bogart and Bi, 2013) where new tetraploids arise from triploid hybrids. Furthermore, while these two species are often found in sympatry, the phylogenetic lineages within either of these species are generally allopatric, thus tetraploids are often sympatric with diploids that are not of the diploid lineage from which the tetraploids evolved.
Species in the complex are known to hybridize (Gerhardt et al., 1994) (male H. chrysoscelis X female H. versicolor).
Booker et al. (2022) determined that H. versicolor was most likely formed via autopolyploidization from a now extinct lineage of H. chrysoscelis. They uncovered evidence of significant hybridization between diploids and tetraploids where they co-occur, and demonstrated that historical hybridization between these groups led to the re-formation of distinct polyploid lineages following the initial whole-genome duplication event.
A histological examination of the type of H. chrysoscelis (Cope 1880) (ANSP 13672) demonstrated that the specimen was actually H. versicolor. In the interest of maintaining stability (at least 70 publications associating H. chrysoscelis with the diploid morphology at the time of publication) the authors chose not to elevate H. v. sandersi (Smith and Brown 1947) and instead petitioned the ICZN (Smith, Fitzgerald, and Guillette 1981) to designate a neotype (the holotype of H. v. sandersi; USNM 123978).
Duellman et al. (2016, Zootaxa 4104: 1–109) restricted Hyla to Eurasia and North Africa and referred the North American and East Asian sister taxon of this group to Dryophytes. This change has not received much of a following in US publications so far.
The species complex is freeze-tolerant and can produce cryoprotectants (glycerol and/or glucose) in response to lowering ambient temperatures (Schmid, 1982).
Their skin secretions can be very irritating to the eyes, so wash your hands after you handle them.
Based on a captive specimen , Snider and Bowler (1992) reported a maximum longevity for these frogs of seven years, nine months, and twenty days.

Bibliography:
1825 LeConte, John E. Remarks on the American species of the genera Hyla and Rana. Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New York 1(2):278-282
Contains the original descriptions of Hyla versicolor page 281, Rana palustris (=Lithobates palustris) page 282, and Rana sylvatica (=Lithobates sylvaticus) page 282.
1880 Cope, Edward D. On the zoological position of Texas. Bulletin of the United States National Museum (17):151
1880 Cragin, Francis W. A preliminary catalogue of Kansas reptiles and batrachians Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 7():112-123
Also listed the Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea) [=Ophibolus doliatus var. coccineus] and Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) [=Spelerpes ruber] from Kansas.
1906 Dickerson, Mary C. The Frog Book; North American Toads and Frogs, with Study of the Habits and Life Histories of Those of the Northeastern States. Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, New York. 253pp.
1906 Hartman, Frank A. Food habits of Kansas lizards and batrachians. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 20():225-229
1925 Linsdale, Jean M. Land Vertebrates of a Limited Area in Eastern Kansas. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 312pp.
1927 Burt, Charles E. An annotated list of the amphibians and reptiles of Riley County, Kansas. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (189):12
Accounts on forty species known from the vicinity of Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas. There have been several scientific names changes since publication, which is understandable... however, some usages cannot be explained by subsequent taxonomic reappraisals(e.g.  Gastrophryne carolinensis for Gastrophryne olivacea). The writer lists Eumeces (=Plestiodon) obsoletus and E. guttulatus yet correctly reasoning that the latter is the young of the former. Within the account of Tantilla gracilis (a common form) the writer mentions that T. nigriceps was reported from Riley County by Branson (1904) but that the specimens at Kansas State were absent at the time of publication. The Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) was first reported from Riley County by Branson (1904) and is reported by the writer based on a specimen in the museum at Kansas State University by Professor E. A. Popenoe. The Prairie Rattlesnake is not currently native to Riley County, and closest reliable localities are 150 to the west.
1927 Linsdale, Jean M. Amphibians and reptiles of Doniphan County, Kansas. Copeia 1927(164):75-81
1928 Ortenburger, Arthur I. The whip snakes and racers: Genera Masticophis and Coluber. Memiors of the University of Michigan Museum (1):1-247
1928 Burt, Charles E. A new amphibian record from Kansas, Hyla phaeocrypta (Cope). Science 67(1747):630-631
1932 Gloyd, Howard K. The herpetological fauna of the Pigeon Lake Region, Miami County, Kansas. Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan 15():389-408
First record of Notophthalmus viridescens from Kansas. Second record (after the type locality) of Pseudacris crucifer from Kansas.
1933 Smith, Hobart M. The Amphibians of Kansas Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 383pp.
The first full accounting of the twenty-five species of amphibians known to occur in Kansas. Includes Ambystoma maculatum which is currently not included in the Kansas faunal list.
1934 Smith, Hobart M. The Amphibians of Kansas. American Midland Naturalist 15(4):377-527
The formal publication of Hobart Smith's Master's Thesis (Smith 1933), though there are several updated and additions. In addition to the species accounts for all twenty-five species, the paper includes a history of amphibian biology in Kansas and discussions on taxonomy and physiography. 
1936 Brumwell, Malcolm J. Distributional records of the reptilia and amphibians of Kansas. Privately printed, . 22pp.
County dot maps of the Kansas herpetofauna. This work has been attributed to have been written around 1933, but that may be in error. 
Hypsiglena jani was not known from Kansas until Claude W. Hibbard collected three specimens on the Stevenson Ranch in north-central Clark County (above Clark State Lake) during June 1936 (Hibbard, 1937). Brumwell plotted this locality, which leads me to believe that the 1936 would have been the earliest date this manuscript could have been written.
1947 Hall, Henry H. and Hobart M. Smith. Selected records of reptiles and amphibians from southeastern Kansas Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 49(4):447-454
Report on certain Kansas specimens housed in the collection at what is now Pittsburg State University. Included are several species of dubious status today, including Cryptobranchus alleganiensis from the Neosho and Spring rivers (the only specimens from those significant drainages ever documented), Ambystoma maculatum from just north of Pittsburg, Crawford County, Heterodon nasicus from Crawford County, Opheodrys vernalis from Crawford County, Sonora episcopa from Crawford County, Agkistrodon piscivorus from Cherokee County, Crotalus atrox from Crawford County, and Crotalus viridis from Crawford County. They report several significant range extensions including Kinosternon flavescens from Turkey Creek in southeast Cherokee County, Graptemys geographica from just north of Pittsburg, Crotaphytus collaris from near Columbus, Cherokee County, Sceloporus consobrinus from just north of Pittsburg, Phrynosoma cornutum from Cherokee and Crawford counties, Heterodon platirhinos from Cherokee and Crawford counties, Haldea striatula from Crawford County, Sistrurus tergeminus from Crawford County, and a 402 lb Macrochelys temminckii in Cherokee County from just east of Chetopa (Labette County). They allude to the potential for Anaxyrus fowleri to occur in southeast Kansas and for native populations of Crotalus atrox in south central Kansas (in part from the disclosure that John R. Breukelman [then of ESU] had obtained three specimens in Woods County Oklahoma, 3/4 of a mile south of the Kansas line). None of the specimens the paper was based on, exist today.
1947 Smith, Hobart M. and Bryce C. Brown. The Texan subspecies of the treefrog, Hyla versicolor. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 60():47-50
Described Hyla versicolor sandersi, (USNM 123978) which would eventually become the type of H. chrysoscelis (Fitzgerald, Smith, and Guillette, 1981).
1948 Bragg, Arthur N. Observations on Hyla versicolor in Oklahoma. Proceedings of the Oklahoma Academy of Science 28():31-35
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
The first modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table and text say 97 on p. 10) and 13 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies.
1951 Brumwell, Malcolm J. An ecological survey of the Fort Leavenworth Military Reservation American Midland Naturalist 45(1):187-231
Published posthumously. Lieutenant Brumwell died December 14, 1941, as a result of injuries incurred during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. This paper is a condensed version of his thesis for the Master's degree.
1956 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. Second edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (9):1-356
Hobart M. Smith's updated second edition of his first (1950) modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table says 97 on p. 10; text says 98 on p. 10) and 11 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies. The second edition has updated taxonomy, added Plestiodon laticeps, and removed Eurycea tynerensis.
1956 Loomis, Richard B. The chigger mites of Kansas (Acarina, Trombiculidae). University of Kansas Science Bulletin 37():1195-1443
Examined 2,628 Kansas reptiles of 48 species consisting of 27 turtles of 4 species, 1,736 lizards of 12 species and 892 snakes of 32 species for chiggers. Eleven species of chiggers were recovered from reptiles.
For amphibians, 1188 individuals of 21 species were examined. Five species of chigger mite were recovered from amphibians.
1958 Blair, W. Frank. Mating call in the speciation of anuran amphibians. The American Naturalist 92(862):27-51
1966 Johnson, C. Species recognition in the Hyla versicolor complex. Texas Journal of Science 18(4):361-364
1966 Chantell, Charles J. Late Coenozoic hylids from the Great Plains. Herpetologica 22(4):259-264
1967 Choate, Jerry R. Wildlife in the Wakarusa Watershed of Northeastern Kansas. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 46pp.
1967 Gier, Herschel T. Vertebrates of the Flint Hills. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 70(1):51-59
1968 Ralin, Dennis B. Ecological and reproductive differentiation in cryptic species of the Hyla versicolor complex (Hylidae). Southwestern Naturalist 13(3):283-300
1970 Wasserman, Aaron O. Polyploidy in the common tree toad Hyla versicolor Le Conte. Science (167):385-386
1972 Holman, J. Alan. Herpetofauna of the Kanopolis local fauna (Pleistocene: Yarmouth) of Kansas. Michigan Academic 5():87-98
1972 Bogart, James P. and Aaron O. Wasserman. Diploid-polyploid cryptic species pairs: A possible clue to evolution by polyploidization in anuran amphibians. Cytogenetics 11():7-24
1972 Pierce, Jack R. and Dennis B. Ralin. Vocalizations and behavior of the males of three species in the Hyla versicolor complex. Herpetologica 28(4):329-337
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
Joseph T. Collins first Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Smith 1956)>
1974 Fleharty, Eugene D. and Jerry D. Johnson. Distributional records of herptiles from the Chautauqua Hills of southeastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 77(1):65-67
1974 Gerhardt, H. Carl. Mating call differences between eastern and western populations of the treefrog Hyla chrysoscelis. Copeia 1974(2):534-536
1974 Karns, Daryl, Ray E. Ashton, Jr., and Thomas Swearingen. Illustrated Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas: An Identification Manual. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History Public Education Series(2):viii + 18
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Caldwell, Janalee P. and Gregory. Glass. Vertebrates of the Woodson County State Fishing Lake and Game Management Area. Pages 62-76 in Preliminary inventory of the biota of Woodson County State Fishing Lake and Game Management Area. Report No. 5. State Biological Survey of Kansas, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Grow, David. The KHS goes to Chetopa. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (13):2-3
Spring field trip (22 May 1976) along the Neosho River.
1976 Ralin, Dennis B. Comparative hybridization of a diploid-tetraploid cryptic species pair of treefrogs. Copeia 1976(1):191-196
1977 Rundquist, Eric M. and Joseph T. Collins. The amphibians of Cherokee County, Kansas. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 12pp.
1977 Perry, Janice. KHS members achieve goal: Get Cottonmouth. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (21):3-4
1977 Ralin, Dennis B. Evolutionary aspects of mating call variation in a diploid-tetraploid species complex of treefrogs (Anura). Evolution 31(4):721-736
1977 Jaslow, Alan P. and Richard C. Vogt. Identification and distribution of Hyla versicolor and Hyla chrysoscelis in Wisconsin. Herpetologica 33(2):201-205
1978 Perry, Janice. KHS successful at Miami County State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (27):5
1978 Collins, Joseph T. and Janalee P. Caldwell. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1977. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 6():70-88
1978 Cash, Marion N. and James P. Bogart. Cytological differentiation of the diploid-tetraploid species pair of North American treefrogs (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae). Journal of Herpetology 12(4):555-558
1978 Hibbard, Claude W.; Richard J. Zakrzewski, Ralph E. Eshelman, Gordon Edmund, Clayton D. Griggs, and Caroline Griggs. Mammals from the Kanopolis Local Fauna, Pleistocene (Yarmouth) of Ellsworth County, Kansas. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, The University of Michigan 25(2):11-44
1979 Guarisco, Hank. Preliminary laboratory observations of predation by native Texas Garter Snakes upon hatchling Five-lined Skinks. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (32):7-8
1979 Ralin, Dennis B. and James S. Rogers. A morphological analysis of a North American diploid-tetraploid complex of treefrogs (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae). Journal of Herpetology 13(3):261-269
1979 Ralin, Dennis B. and Robert K. Selander. Evolutionary genetics of diploid-tetraploid species of treefrogs of the genus Hyla. Evolution 33(2):595-608
1979 Roble, Steven M. Dispersal movements and plant associations of juvenile Gray Treefrogs, Hyla versicolor LeConte. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 82():235-245
1980 Olson, R. Earl. The herpetofauna of Minnesota: The status of Minnesota treefrogs of the Hyla versicolor complex. Minnesota Natural Heritage Program, Minneapolis. 18pp.
1980 Bogart, James P. Evolutionary implications of polyploidy in amphibians and reptiles. Pages 341-378 in Polyploidy Plenum Press, New York. pp.
1980 Spencer, Dwight. Spencer, D. 1980. Ross Natural History Reservation: the first twenty years, 1959 to 1979. Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas.. 64pp.
1981 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1980. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 10():7-19
1981 Fitzgerald, Kevin T., Hobart M. Smith, and Louis J. Guillette, Jr. Nomenclature of the diploid species of the diploid-tetraploid Hyla versicolor complex. Journal of Herpetology 15(3):356-360
A histological examination of the type of H. chrysoscelis (Cope 1880) (ANSP 13672) demonstrated that the specimen was actually H. versicolor. In the interest of maintaining stability (at least 70 publications associating H. chrysoscelis with the diploid morphology at the time of publication) the authors chose not to elevate H. v. sandersi (Smith and Brown 1947) and instead petitioned the ICZN (Smith, Fitzgerald, and Guillette 1992) to designate a new neotype (the holotype of H. v. sandersi; USNM 123978).
1982 Fitch, Henry S. Resources of a snake community in prairie-woodland habitat of northeastern Kansas. Pages 83-97 in Herpetological communities: A symposium of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles and the Herpetologists League, August 1977.  Wildlife Research Reports 12. 239 pp. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D. C. pp.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
Joseph T. Collins second Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1974)>
1982 Schmid, William D. Survival of frogs in low temperatures. Science 215(4533):697-698
1983 Miller, Larry L. Bourbon County field trip well attended and successful. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (54):6-7
1983 Godwin, G. J. and Steven M Roble. Mating success in male treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis (Anura: Hylidae). Herpetologica 39(2):141-146
1983 Ralin, Dennis B., Michael A. Romano and C. William Kilpatrick. The tetraploid treefrog Hyla versicolor: Evidence for a single origin from the diploid H.chrysoscelis . Herpetologica 39(3):212-225
1984 Brown, Kenneth L. Pomona: A plains village variant in eastern Kansas and western Missouri. Dissertation. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 519pp.
1984 Heinrich, Mark L. Herpetofauna of the Konza Prairie Research Natural Area in the Flint Hills region of Kansas with respect to habitat selection. Thesis. Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. 57pp.
1984 Secor, Stephen M. and Charles C. Carpenter. Distribution maps of Oklahoma reptiles. Oklahoma Herpetological Society Special Publication (3):1-57
1985 Collins, Joseph T. and David M. Hillis. Final report to the Kansas Fish and Game Commission on the Gray Treefrogs of Kansas. Contract #75. ():12
1985 Lynch, John D. Annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of Nebraska. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Science 13():33-57
1985 Heinrich, Mark L. and D. W. Kaufman. Herpetofauna of the Konza Prairie Research Natural Area, Kansas Prairie Naturalist 17(2):101-112
1985 Roble, Steven M. Observations on satellite males in Hyla chrysoscelis, Hyla picta, and Pseudacris triseriata. Journal of Herpetology 19():432-436
1986 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1985. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (63):4
1987 Coleman, Keith. Annual KHS Field Trip held at Atchison State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (68):5-6
1987 Simmons, John E. Gray Treefrogs in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (68):7
1987 Chaffin, Phyllis and Stanley E. Trauth. Hyla versicolor-chrysoscelis species complex of Gray Treefrogs in Arkansas: Histological and ultrastructural evidence. Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science 41(7):20-23
1987 Hillis, David M., Joseph T. Collins, and James P. Bogart. Distribution of diploid and tetraploid species of Gray Tree Frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor) in Kansas American Midland Naturalist 117(1):214-217
1987 Romano, Michael A., Dennis B. Ralin, Sheldon I. Guttman and John H. Skillings. Parallel electromorph variation in the diploid-tetraploid Gray Treefrog complex. The American Naturalist 130(6):864-878
1988 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1987. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (71):13-19
1989 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1989. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (78):16-21
1990 Simon, Martin P. and Joseph H. Dorlac. The results of a faunistic survey of reptiles and amphibians of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. 11pp.
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Fitch, Henry S. Reptiles and amphibians of the Kansas ecological reserves. Pages 71-74 in Ecology and Hydrology of Kansas Ecological Reserves and the Baker Wetlands. Multidisciplinary Guidebook 4. Kansas Academy of Science, Lawrence, Kansas. pp.
1991 Collins, Joseph T. Results of third Kansas herp count held during April-May 1991. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (85):9-13
1991 Mable, Barbara and James P. Bogart. Call analysis of triploid hybrids resulting from diploid-tetraploid species of crosses of hylid tree frogs. Bioacoustics 3():111-119
1992 Taggart, Travis W. Observations on Kansas amphibians and reptiles Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (88):13-15
1992 Collins, Joseph T. Results of the fourth Kansas herp count held during April-May 1992. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (89):10-
1992 Tanner, S. Comparison of the arrival times and tenure at the chorus of two populations of Gray Treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor). Missouri Herpetological Association Newsletter 5():2
1992 Ptacek, Margaret B. Calling sites used by male gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor and Hyla chrysoscelis, in sympatry and allopatry in Missouri. Herpetologica 48(4):373-382
1992 Smith, Hobart M., Kevin T. Fitzgerald, and Louis J. Guillette, Jr. Note on the proposed designation of a neotype for Hyla chrysoscelis Cope, 1880, and the designation of a neotype for H. versicolor le Conte, 1825 (Amphibia, Anura). Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature 49():151–152
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
Joseph T. Collins third Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1982)>
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the fifth Kansas herp count held during April-June 1993 . Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (94):7-11
1993 Viets, Brian E. An annotated list of the herpetofauna of the F. B., and Rena G. Ross Natural History Reservation. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 96(1/2):103-113
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (97):5-14
See, 1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Additions and corrections [to the results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994]. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):4.
1994 Riedle, J. Daren. A survey of reptiles and amphibians at Montgomery County State Fishing Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):11-13
1994 Ptacek, Margaret B., H. Carl Gerhardt and Richard D. Sage. Speciation by polyploidy in treefrogs: Multiple origins of the tetraploid, Hyla versicolor. Evolution 48(3):898-908
1994 Gerhardt, H. Carl, Margaret B. Ptacek, Louise Barnett, and Kenneth G. Torke. Hybridization in the diploid-tetraploid treefrogs Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor. Copeia 1994(1):51-59
1995 Holman, J. Alan. Pleistocene Amphibians and Reptiles. Oxford University Press, New York. 243pp.
1995 Anderson, Lewis, Mark Shaw, Jeff Blodig, and Tom Walker. Report to the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks: Herps encountered during REmap project, summer 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (99):10-17
1995 Moriarty, Emily C. and Joseph T. Collins. First known occurrence of amphibian species in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (100):28-30
1995 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the seventh annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1995. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (101):11-17
1995 Moriarty, Emily C. and Joseph T. Collins. An estimate of numbers of Plains leopard frogs at a site in northeastern Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (102):14-15
1996 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eighth annual KHS herp counts Held 1 April-31 May 1996. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (104):6-17
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1996 Ptacek, Margaret B. Interspecific similarity in life-history traits in sympatric populations of gray treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor. Herpetologica 52(3):323-332
1996 Shoup, J. Mark. Treefrogs, indeed! Kansas Wildlife and Parks 53(4):34
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the ninth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1997. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (108):12-17
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Addendum to 1997 KHS herp counts. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (109):14-15
1997 Collins, Joseph T. A report on the KHS fall field trip to the Marais des Cygnes wildlife refuges. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (110):2-3
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. A Key to Amphibians & Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 131pp.
1998 Gamble, Jerre. Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartford, Kansas. 91pp.
1998 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the tenth annual KHS herp counts for 1998, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (112):11-18
1999 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas Herpetological Society herp counts: A 10 year summary and evaluation. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (115):42962
1999 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1998. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (116):14-15
2000 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eleventh and twelfth annual KHS herpetofaunal counts for 1999-2000, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):11-16
2000 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2000 fall field trip. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):6-8
2000 Keller, Michael J. Validity of nucleolar number for identification of the diploid-tetraploid gray treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor. Copeia 2000(3):860-862
2001 Fitch, Henry S. Further study of the garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis, in northeastern Kansas. Scientific Papers of the Natural History Museum University of Kansas (19):1-6
2001 Ellis, Mark R. Reproduction in the Common Garter Snake in Shawnee County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (125):12
2001 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the thirteenth annual KHS herp counts for 2001, held 1 April-30 June. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (125):13-16
2001 Oberfoell, Catherine E. C. and James L. Christiansen. Identification and distribution of the treefrogs Hyla versicolor and Hyla chrysoscelis in Iowa. Journal of the Iowa Academy of Sciences 108(3):79-83
2001 Keller, Michael J. and H. Carl Gerhardt. Polyploidy alters advertisement call structure in gray tree frogs. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 268():341–345
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2002 Fogell, Daniel D. Occurrence and relative abundance of amphibians and reptiles at Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Homestead National Monument of America, and Pipestone National Monument within the Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network. Interim Report. National Park Service, Washington, D.C.. 6pp.
2002 Riedle, J. Daren and A. Hynek. Amphibian and reptile inventory of the Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, Labette County, Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (2):18-20
2002 Miller, Larry L. Geographic distribution: Hyla chrysoscelis. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):14
2002 Gubanyi, James E. Osage County herp count I. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):15
2002 Miller, Larry L. Shawnee County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):15
2003 Fogell, Daniel D. A herpetofaunal inventory of Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Homestead National Monument of America, and Pipestone National Monument within the Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network. National Park Service, Washington, D.C.. 59pp.
This is the version the author submitted to the NPS. Their final publication was modified.
2003 Suleiman, G. Fort Riley herpetofaunal count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):11-12
2003 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 2002. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):13-16
2003 Taggart, Travis W. KHS conducts first systematic road survey. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):11-12
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2003 KHS spring field trip to Wilson County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):2-5
2003 Burr, Andrew. Coffey County herp count 1. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):7
2003 Gubanyi, James E. Osage County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):8
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2003 fall field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (8):14-15
2004 Holloway, Alisha K. Polyploid origins, experimental evolution of gene duplicates, and duplication and divergence of reproductive genes. Dissertation. University of Texas, Austin. 78pp.
2004 Coleman, Keith. Life history. Hyla chrysoscelis. New Kansas maximum size. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (10):11
2004 Gubanyi, James E. Osage County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):11
2004 Gubanyi, James E. Wilson County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):12
2004 Schmidt, Curtis J. Geographic distribution: Hyla chrysoscelis/Hyla versicolor. Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):13
County record, Washington County, Kansas.
2005 Lannoo, Michael (Editor) Amphibian Declines: The Conservation Status of United States Species. University fo California Press, Berkeley. 1115pp.
2005 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2005 fall field trip [to Crawford County]. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (16):19-21
2006 Altig, Ronald, Roy W. McDiarmid, Kimberly A. Nichols, and Paul C. Ustach. Tadpoles of the United States and Canada: A Tutorial and Key Electronic files accessible at http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/tadpole/. Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD, USA. ():
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2006 Anderson, Lewis R. and Joseph A. Arruda. Land use and anuran biodiversity in southeast Kansas, USA. Amphibian and Reptile Conservation 4(1):46-59
2006 Wrijenhoek, Robert C. Polyploid hybrids: Multiple origins of a treefrog species. Current Biology 16(7):R245-R247
2006 Holloway, Alisha K., David C. Cannatella, H. Carl Gerhardt, and David M. Hillis. Polyploids with different origins and ancestors form a single sexual polyploid species. The American Naturalist 167(4):E88-E101
2009 Murrow, Daniel G. KHS 2009 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (29):42769
2009 Miller, Larry L. Geographic distribution. Hyla chrysoscelis (Cope's Gray Treefrog). Journal of Kansas Herpetology (30):11
County record for Harper County, Kansas.
2010 Miller, Larry L. Investigation of the Checkered Garter Snake in Kansas with notes on other Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles encountered. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 31pp.
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
Joseph T. Collins fourth Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1993)>
2010 Murrow, Daniel G. Kansas Herpetological Society spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (33):2-3
2011 McMartin, David C. U. S. Army 2011 Fort Leavenworth Herpetofaunal Survey: 23 April - 09 May 2011. Privately printed, Leavenworth, Kansas. 33pp.
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Spring Field Trip to Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (38):2-4
2011 McMartin, D. Chris. Herp Count: Fort Leavenworth Herpetofaunal Survey for 2011. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (39):8-9
2011 Houck, Mike. Fort Riley Herpetofaunal Survey for 2011. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (39):9
2011 Mitchell, Joseph C. and Christopher A. Paige. Advertisement call and distribution of the treefrogs Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor in Virginia. Virginia Journal of Science 62(4):139-148
2011 Tucker, Mitch A. and H. C. Gerhardt. Parallel changes in mate-attracting calls and female preferences in autotriploid tree frogs. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 279():1583–1587
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2012 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada: Second Edition, Revised and Updated. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 152pp.
2013 Dodd, C. Kenneth. Frogs of the United States and Canada. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 982pp.
2013 Bass, Neil. The Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Project: For the river, for you, and for herps. Collinsorum 2(1/2):10-11
2013 Miller, Larry L. Wellington Lake Herpetological Survey. Collinsorum 2(1/2):12
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Spring Field Trip to Bourbon County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):3
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Fall Field Trip to Atchison County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Spring Field Trip to Schermerhorn Park, Cherokee County. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Fall Field Trip to Butler County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):6
2013 Mardis, Dexter and Kevin Scott. 2013 Kansas Herpetofaunal Counts. Collinsorum 2(3/4):7
2013 Johnson, Stephen R. Half-time herping on one big prairie. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 48(5):65-66
2013 Langford, Gabriel J. and John Janovy Jr. Host specificity of North American Rhabdias spp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae): Combining field data and experimental infections with a molecular phylogeny. The Journal of Parasitology 99(2):277- 286
2013 Bogart, James P. and K. Bi. Genetic and genomic interactions of animals with different ploidy levels. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 140(2-4):117–136
2014 McMartin, D. Chris. Fort Leavenworth Heretofaunal Survey for 2013. Collinsorum 3(1):10
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS Fall Field Trip to Woodson County. Collinsorum 3(2-4):12
2015 Bass, Neil. Herpetological (Frog and Turtle) Inventories along the Missouri River in Kansas. Collinsorum 4(1):5-9
2015 Taggart, Travis W. Fall Field Trip Held In Washington County. Collinsorum 4(3):4
2016 Pittman, Galen L., Henry S. Fitch, and W. Dean Kettle. Vertebrate animals on the Fitch Natural History Reservation (1948-2002) Kansas Biological Survey Report Number 188, Lawrence. 48pp.
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2016 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Summer field trip to Caney River, Chautauqua County, Kansas. Collinsorum 5(2-3):4-5
2016 Duellman, William E., Angela B. Marion, and S. Blair Hedges. Phylogenetics, classification, and biogeography of the treefrogs (Amphibia: Anura: Arboranae). Zootaxa 4101(1):109
2017 Snyder, Ariel. Survey Of Anuran Chytrid (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in Kansas and the Influence of Anuran Life History in Occurrence. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 53pp.
2017 Taggart, Travis W. and J. Daren Riedle. A Pocket Guide to Kansas Amphibians, Turtles and Lizards. Great Plains Nature Center, Wichita, Kansas. 69pp.
2017 Crother, Brian I. (editor) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding. Eighth edition. Herpetological Circulars (43):102
2017 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2017 KHS Spring Field Trip to Elk County, Kansas. Collinsorum 6(2-3):6-8
2018 Houck, Mike. Herp Count: Fort Riley Military Installation Collinsorum 7(1):17
2018 Carlson, Zane A. and Keith Geluso. Second sighting of Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) in Buffalo County, Nebraska Collinsorum 7(1):18
2019 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Third Edition. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 192pp.
2019 Zhang, Jia-Yong, Bryan E. Luu, Dan-Na Yua, Le-Ping Zhang, Rasha Al-attar, and Kenneth B. Storey. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dryophytes versicolor: Phylogenetic relationship among Hylidae and mitochondrial protein-coding gene expression in response to freezing and anoxia. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules 132():461-469
2020 Bogart, James P., Patrick Burgess, and Jinzhong Fu. Revisiting the evolution of the North American tetraploid treefrog (Hyla versicolor) Genome ():
2020 Booker, William W., H. Carl Gerhardt, Alan R. Lemmon, Margaret B. Ptacek, Alyssa T. B. Hassinger, Johannes Schul, and Emily Moriarty Lemmon. The complex history of genome duplication and hybridization in North American Gray Treefrogs. Systematic Biology ():
Pre-print/Advance access version. The manuscript was eventually published in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 39(2).
2020 Daniel, Richard E. and Brian S. Edmond. Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2019. Privately printed, Columbia, Missouri. 86pp.
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
2020 Hullinger, Allison, Zackary Cordes, Daren Riedle, and William Stark. Habitat assessment of the Broad-headed Skink (Plestiodon laticeps) and the associated squamate community in eastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 123(1-2):137-150
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Neosho County: KHS-2020-01 Collinsorum 9(3):11
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Cherokee County: KHS-2020-02 Collinsorum 9(3):11-12
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Cherokee County: KHS-2020-03 Collinsorum 9(3):12
2022 Lazerus, Nora K. Efficacy of Non-Lethal Molecular Methods in Elucidating Distribution of Gray Treefrog Complex (Hyla chrysoscelis/versicolor) in Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 25pp.
2022 Buckardt, Emma M. Amphibian Occupancy and Diversity on a Post-mined Landscape. Thesis. Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas. 93pp.
2022 Booker, William W., H. Carl Gerhardt, Alan R. Lemmon, Margaret B. Ptacek, Alyssa T.B. Hassinger, Johannes Schul, and Emily Moriarty Lemmon. The complex history of genome duplication and hybridization in North American Gray Treefrogs. Molecular Biology and Evolution 39(2):19
2023 Dodd, C. Kenneth. Frogs of the United States and Canada. Second Edition. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 1032pp.
2023 Buckardt, Emma M., Christine C. Rega‑Brodsky, and Andrew D. George. Post‑mined wetlands provide breeding habitat for amphibians. Wetlands 43(75):1-11
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University