COPE'S GRAY TREEFROG/GRAY TREEFROG COMPLEX
Hyla chrysoscelis/versicolor LeConte 1825/Cope 1880
hī-lă — crī-sôs-ē'-lĭs/vĕr-sĭ'-kələr


Conservation Status:

State: None

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S5 - Secure
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None

Adult pair of from Wilson County. Image © Travis W. Taggart
An adult from Belle Plaine, Sumner County. Image © Cassie Murray.
An adult from Sedgwick County, Kansas. Photograph by Carl B. Davis ©.
An adult from Waubaunsee County. Image © Jim Scharosch.
A tadpole of Hyla chrysoscelis/versicolor. Image © Altig et al. (2006).

Description:
These two species of frogs are identical in appearance:
Cope's Gray Treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) vary in color from mottled gray to light green but their color can change depending on activity and environment. There is usually a light spot beneath the eye. The inner thigh is bright yellow or orange, but this is seldom visible without examination.
Like the Cope’s Gray Treefrog, the dorsal surface of the Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) is rough and lightly sprinkled with warts. The ground color may be shades of brown, gray, or green, with stipple-edged black blotches. The large wet toe-pads help the frog to adhere to smooth bark or man-made structures.
Adults normally reach 32-58 mm (1¼- 2¼ inches) in snout-vent length. The largest Kansas specimen is a female Hyla chrysoscelis (FHSM 8430) from Miami County with a snout-vent length of 54 mm (2½ inches) collected by Keith Coleman on 20 March 2004. The maximum length throughout the range: 2 3/8 inches (Conant and Collins, 1998).

Distribution:
Found throughout the forested regions of the eastern third of Kansas. An isolated record exists at in Pratt County and may represent an accidental introduction at the state fish hatchery.
The tetraploid Gray Treefrog is morphologically indistinguishable from the diploid Cope’s Gray Treefrog and both species occupy similar ranges, however, the Cope’s Gray Treefrog is more widely distributed in Kansas. Gray Treefrogs are known from the Verdigris, Marias des Cygnes, and Kansas River drainages in Kansas.
Collins and Hillis (1985) and Hillis et al. (1987) analyzed the chromosomes of both species throughout Kansas. They found H. chrysoscelis throughout the eastern third of Kansas. H. versicolor was found in the Cross Timbers, lower Neosho River basin, the Marais des Cygnes, and the lower Kansas river basins. They determined the specific status for the following specimens:
Hyla chrysoscelis: Chase Co.: KU 203673; Chautauqua Co.: KU 203710; Cherokee Co.: KU 33490, 203665-68, 203706-07, 203720-22; Coffey Co.: KU 203705; Crawford Co.: KU 203718-19; Douglas Co.: KU 16371, 16373-381, 203995-96, 203991-92, 203993-94, 203676- 79, 203712-714; Elk Co.: KU 203711; Franklin Co.: KU 203669-671, 204038; Greenwood Co.: KU 203701; Jackson Co.: KU 203690-94; Jefferson Co.: KU 17398; Johnson Co.: KU 203723-24; Leavenworth Co.: KU 21145; Marshall Co.: KU 49182-84; Miami Co.: KU 203672, 204037; Montgomery Co.: KU 203708-09; Neosho Co.: KU 203715-17; Osage Co.: KU 17681, 203689; Pottawatomie Co.: KU 203674-75; Riley Co.: KU 203698-700; Shawnee Co.: KU 203688; Wabaunsee Co.: KU 203695-97; Wilson Co.: KU 203680-87; Woodson Co.: KU 203702-04
Hyla versicolor: Atchison Co.: KU 203740-41; Bourbon Co.: KU 28672; Cherokee Co.: KU 28671, 31099, 203746; Douglas Co.: KU 8122, 22013, 203745; Elk Co.: KU 203742-44; Franklin Co.: KU 203735; Greenwood Co.: KU 22931; Jefferson Co.: KU 203732-34; Miami Co.: KU 21833, 22112, 203736-39.
(, Museum Voucher) (, Observation) (, Literature Record)
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  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 1,469
    Records 
  • 738
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 731
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Allen (15); Anderson (1); Atchison (7); Bourbon (16); Brown (2); Butler (7); Chase (25); Chautauqua (12); Cherokee (217); Clay (9); Coffey (101); Cowley (1); Crawford (33); Dickinson (2); Doniphan (21); Douglas (221); Elk (8); Franklin (30); Geary (2); Greenwood (59); Harper (3); Jackson (56); Jefferson (18); Johnson (9); Labette (35); Leavenworth (59); Linn (78); Lyon (4); Marshall (8); Miami (49); Montgomery (52); Morris (1); Nemaha (10); Neosho (15); Osage (31); Pottawatomie (92); Pratt (1); Republic (2); Riley (34); Sedgwick (3); Shawnee (7); Sumner (5); Unknown (2); Wabaunsee (51); Washington (12); Wilson (19); Woodson (21); Wyandotte (3);

Natural History:
Chorusing is most frequent at night, but individuals often call during daytime in response to thunder or other loud noises. Chorusing/breeding activity is stimulated by precipitation and warm temperatures. Eggs are attached to emergent plants in clusters of ten to forty on the surface of shallow ponds and other small bodies of water. These are usually temporary bodies of water lacking fish. Eggs hatch in approximately five days and metamorphosis takes place at about 45-65 days. The tadpoles consume organic debris, algae, and plant tissues and rarely overwinter. Adults and metamorphs will migrate hundreds of meters between breeding and terrestrial sites.
The two species are best distinguished by their call during the breeding season; the Cope’s Gray Treefrog having a faster trill. Found throughout the eastern third of Kansas.
Much of their activity is spent high in trees where they hide by day and forage for insects on humid nights. They are most often encountered during the breeding season when they call from vegetation surrounding wetlands in April and May. During the summer the are attracted to human dwelling where they remain hidden by day and prowl windows and outdoor lights at night foraging for insects attracted to the light.
A specimen from Pottawatomie County contained a small cricket (Hartman 1906).

Occurrence Activity:
The blue dates denote chorusing actity. The red dates are other occurrences. The darker a date is, the greater the relative number of observations for that date.
Chorusing:

Audio recording by Keith Coleman.

Chorusing Phenology: The black outlined dots denote the Julian date (day of the year; 1 January = 1 to 31 December = 365) an observation was made. The thin red line depicts the range of dates between the beginning of the first, and end of the fourth quartile (excluding outliers; Tukey method). The thick light blue bar represents the second and third quartile (interquartile range; the middle 50% of all observations). Only one observation per Julian date is included in the graphs; so a date with multiple observations carries the same weight as a date with only one observation. The vertical bars correspond to the 12 months of the year; January through December.
# Unique Obervations: 728; Range: 16 Mar to 23 Jul; Interquartile range: 29 Apr to 19 Jun;

Observation Type: (of recorded types)
Remarks:
First reported in Kansas by Cragin, (1880). The earliest existing specimen is from 1909 (MVZ 43356).
A complex of two separate, yet externally indistinguishable, species. For this reason, they are included in the same account, however, it should be noted that this arrangement should not minimize their recognition as independent evolutionary entities. Diploid Hyla chrysoscelis and tetraploid H. versicolor are cryptic species that range across much of eastern North America (Bogart, 1980; Powell, et al. 2016). The two species cannot be distinguished by morphology, but they have distinctly different calls (pulse rate at the same temperature) (Blair, 1958; Johnson, 1966; Gerhardt, 1974) that was noted prior to their recognition as different species (Wasserman, 1970; Bogart and Wasserman, 1972). They also differ in cell volume, nucleolar organizing regions (NOR's) (Keller, 2000), and as stated, karyotype. 
H. versicolor is the result of recurrent hybrid origins with a complex reticulate evolutionary history. Tetraploid H. versicolor is likely polyphyletic. Ptacek et al., (1994), analyzed mitochondrial sequences to infer that H. versicolor arose at least three times, twice from H. chrysoscelis and once from an unknown maternal ancestor. Holloway et al. (2006), using mitochondrial and nuclear markers, suggested that H. versicolor arose multiple times from H. chrysoscelis and two other extinct lineages. Rather than tetraploidy arising anew from diploid ancestors, the available mitochondrial data would also support the ‘triploid bridge hypothesis' (Ralin and Selander, 1979; Bogart and Bi, 2013) where new tetraploids arise from triploid hybrids. Furthermore, while these two species are often found in sympatry, the phylogenetic lineages within either of these species are generally allopatric, thus tetraploids are often sympatric with diploids that are not of the diploid lineage from which the tetraploids evolved.
Species in the complex are known to hybridize (Gerhardt et al., 1994) (male H. chrysoscelis X female H. versicolor).
Their skin secretions can be very irritating to the eyes, so wash your hands after you handle them.
The species complex is freeze-tolerant and can produce cryoprotectants (glycerol and/or glucose) in response to lowering ambient temperatures (Schmid, 1982). Duellman et al. (2016, Zootaxa 4104: 1–109) restricted Hyla to Eurasia and North Africa and referred the North American and East Asian sister taxon of this group to Dryophytes.

Bibliography:
1825 Le Conte, John E. Remarks on the American species of the genera Hyla and Rana. Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of New York 1(2):278-282
1880 Cope, Edward D. On the zoological position of Texas. Bulletin of the United States National Museum (17):151
1906 Dickerson, Mary C. The Frog Book; North American Toads and Frogs, with Study of the Habits and Life Histories of Those of the Northeastern States. Doubleday, Page & Company, New York, New York. 253pp.
1906 Hartman, Frank A. Food habits of Kansas lizards and batrachians. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 20():225-229
1925 Linsdale, Jean M. Land Vertebrates of a Limited Area in Eastern Kansas. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 312pp.
1927 Linsdale, Jean M. Amphibians and reptiles of Doniphan County, Kansas. Copeia 1927(164):75-81
1928 Burt, Charles E. A new amphibian record from Kansas, Hyla phaeocrypta (Cope). Science 67(1747):630-631
1932 Gloyd, Howard K. The herpetological fauna of the Pigeon Lake Region, Miami County, Kansas. Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan 15():389-408
1933 Smith, Hobart M. The Amphibians of Kansas Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 383pp.
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
1956 Loomis, Richard B. The chigger mites of Kansas (Acarina, Trombiculidae). University of Kansas Science Bulletin 37():1195-1443
1958 Blair, W. Frank. Mating call in the speciation of anuran amphibians. The American Naturalist 92(862):27-51
1966 Johnson, C. Species recognition in the Hyla versicolor complex. Texas Journal of Science 18(4):361-364
1968 Ralin, Dennis B. Ecological and reproductive differentiation in cryptic species of the Hyla versicolor complex (Hylidae). Southwestern Naturalist 13(3):283-300
1970 Wasserman, Aaron O. Polyploidy in the common tree toad Hyla versicolor Le Conte. Science (167):385-386
1972 Bogart, James P. and Aaron O. Wasserman. Diploid-polyploid cryptic species pairs: A possible clue to evolution by polyploidization in anuran amphibians. Cytogenetics 11():7-24
1972 Pierce, Jack R. and Dennis B. Ralin. Vocalizations and behavior of the males of three species in the Hyla versicolor complex. Herpetologica 28(4):329-337
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
1974 Gerhardt, H. Carl. Mating call differences between eastern and western populations of the treefrog Hyla chrysoscelis. Copeia 1974(2):534-536
1974 Karns, Daryl, Ray E. Ashton, Jr., and Thomas Swearingen. Illustrated Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas: An Identification Manual. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History Public Education Series(2):viii + 18
1976 Caldwell, Janalee P. and Gregory. Glass. Vertebrates of the Woodson County State Fishing Lake and Game Management Area. Pages 62-76 in Preliminary inventory of the biota of Woodson County State Fishing Lake and Game Management Area. Report No. 5. State Biological Survey of Kansas, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Grow, David. The KHS goes to Chetopa. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (13):2-3
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1977 Jaslow, Alan P. and Richard C. Vogt Identification and distribution of Hyla versicolor and Hyla chrysoscelis in Wisconsin. Herpetologica 33(2):201-205
1977 Perry, Janice. KHS members achieve goal: Get Cottonmouth. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (21):3-4
1977 Rundquist, Eric M. and Joseph T. Collins. The amphibians of Cherokee County, Kansas. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 12pp.
1978 Cash, Marion N. and James P. Bogart. Cytological differentiation of the diploid-tetraploid species pair of North American treefrogs (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae). Journal of Herpetology 12(4):555-558
1978 Perry, Janice. KHS successful at Miami County State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (27):5
1979 Guarisco, Hank. Preliminary laboratory observatoins of predation by native Texas Garter Snakes upon hatchling Five-lined Skinks. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (32):7-8
1979 Ralin, Dennis B. and James S. Rogers. A morphological analysis of a North American diploid-tetraploid complex of treefrogs (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae). Journal of Herpetology 13(3):261-269
1979 Ralin, Dennis B. and Robert K. Selander. Evolutionary genetics of diploid-tetraploid species of treefrogs of the genus Hyla. Evolution 33(2):595-608
1980 Bogart, James P. Evolutionary implications of polyploidy in amphibians and reptiles. Pages 341-378 in Polyploidy Plenum Press, New York. pp.
1980 Olson, R. Earl. The herpetofauna of Minnesota: The status of Minnesota treefrogs of the Hyla versicolor complex. Minnesota Natural Heritage Program, Minneapolis. 18pp.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
1982 Fitch, Henry S. Resources of a snake community in prairie-woodland habitat of northeastern Kansas. Pages 83-97 in Herpetological communities: A symposium of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles and the Herpetologists League, August 1977.  Wildlife Research Reports 12. 239 pp. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D. C. pp.
1982 Schmid, William D. Survival of frogs in low temperatures. Science 215(4533):697-698
1983 Godwin, G. J., and S. M. Roble. Mating success in male treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis (Anura: Hylidae). Herpetologica 39(2):141-146
1983 Miller, Larry L. Bourbon County field trip well attended and successful. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (54):6-7
1985 Collins, Joseph T. and David M. Hillis Final report to the Kansas Fish and Game Commission on the Gray Treefrogs of Kansas. Contract #75. ():12
1986 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1985. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (63):4
1987 Chaffin, Phyllis and Stanley E. Trauth. Hyla versicolor-chrysoscelis species complex of Gray Treefrogs in Arkansas: Histological and ultrastructural evidence. Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science 41(7):20-23
1987 Coleman, Keith. Annual KHS Field Trip held at Atchison State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (68):5-6
1987 Hillis, David M., Joseph T. Collins, and James P. Bogart Distribution of diploid and tetraploid species of Gray Tree Frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor) in Kansas American Midland Naturalist 117(1):214-217
1987 Romano, Michael A., Dennis B. Ralin, Sheldon I. Guttman and John H. Skillings. Parallel electromorph variation in the diploid-tetraploid Gray Treefrog complex. The American Naturalist 130(6):864-878
1987 Simmons, John E. Gray Treefrogs in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (68):7
1988 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1987. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (71):13-19
1989 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1989. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (78):16-21
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1991 Collins, Joseph T. Results of third Kansas herp count held during April-May 1991. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (85):9-13
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Fitch, Henry S. Reptiles and amphibians of the Kansas ecological reserves. Pages 71-74 in Multidisciplinary Guidebook 4. Kansas Academy of Science, Lawrence. pp.
1991 Mable, Barbara and James P. Bogart. Call analysis of triploid hybrids resulting from diploid-tetraploid species of crosses of hylid tree frogs. Bioacoustics 3():111-119
1992 Collins, Joseph T. Results of the fourth Kansas herp count held during April-May 1992. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (89):10-
1992 Ptacek, Margaret B. Calling sites used by male gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor and Hyla chrysoscelis, in sympatry and allopatry in Missouri. Herpetologica 48(4):373-382
1992 Taggart, Travis W. Observations on Kansas amphibians and reptiles Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (88):13-15
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the fifth Kansas herp count held during April-June 1993 . Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (94):7-11
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
1994 Gerhardt, H. Carl, Margaret B. Ptacek, Louise Barnett, and Kenneth G. Torke. Hybridization in the diploid-tetraploid treefrogs Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor. Copeia 1994(1):51-59
1994 Ptacek, Margaret B., H. Carl Gerhardt and Richard D. Sage. Speciation by polyploidy in treefrogs: Multiple origins of the tetraploid, Hyla versicolor. Evolution 48(3):898-908
1994 Riedle, J. Daren. A survey of reptiles and amphibians at Montgomery County State Fishing Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):11-13
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (97):5-14
1995 Anderson, Lewis, Mark Shaw, Jeff Blodig, and Tom Walker. Report to the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks: Herps encountered during REmap project, summer 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (99):10-17
1995 Moriarty, Emily C. and Joseph T. Collins. An estimate of numbers of Plains leopard frogs at a site in northeastern Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (102):14-15
1995 Moriarty, Emily C. and Joseph T. Collins. First known occurrence of amphibian species in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (100):28-30
1995 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the seventh annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1995. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (101):11-17
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1996 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eighth annual KHS herp counts Held 1 April-31 May 1996. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (104):6-17
1997 Collins, Joseph T. A report on the KHS fall field trip to the Marais des Cygnes wildlife refuges. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (110):2-3
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Addendum to 1997 KHS herp counts. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (109):14-15
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the ninth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1997. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (108):12-17
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Gamble, Jerre Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartford, Kansas. 91pp.
1998 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the tenth annual KHS herp counts for 1998, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (112):11-18
1999 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1998. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (116):14-15
1999 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas Herpetological Society herp counts: A 10 year summary and evaluation. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (115):42962
2000 Keller, Michael J. Validity of nucleolar number for identification of the diploid-tetraploid gray treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor. Copeia 2000(3):860-862
2000 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eleventh and twelfth annual KHS herpetofaunal counts for 1999-2000, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):11-16
2000 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2000 fall field trip. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):6-8
2001 Ellis, Mark R. Reproduction in the Common Garter Snake in Shawnee County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (125):12
2001 Fitch, Henry S. Further study of the garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis, in northeastern Kansas. Scientific Papers of the Natural History Museum University of Kansas (19):1-6
2001 Oberfoell, Catherine E. C. and James L. Christiansen. Identification and distribution of the treefrogs Hyla versicolor and Hyla chrysoscelis in Iowa. Journal of the Iowa Academy of Sciences 108(3):79-83
2001 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the thirteenth annual KHS herp counts for 2001, held 1 April-30 June. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (125):13-16
2002 Gubanyi, James E.. Osage County herp count I. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):15
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2002 Miller, Larry L. Geographic distribution: Hyla chrysoscelis. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):14
2002 Miller, Larry L. Shawnee County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (4):15
2002 Riedle, J. Daren and A. Hynek. Amphibian and reptile inventory of the Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, Labette County, Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (2):18-20
2003 Burr, Andrew. Coffey County herp count 1. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):7
2003 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 2002. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):13-16
2003 Gubanyi, James E. Osage County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):8
2003 Suleiman, G. Fort Riley herpetofaunal count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):11-12
2003 Taggart, Travis W. KHS conducts first systematic road survey. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):11-12
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2003 KHS spring field trip to Wilson County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):2-5
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2003 fall field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (8):14-15
2004 Coleman, Keith. Life history. Hyla chrysoscelis. New Kansas maximum size. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (10):11
2004 Gubanyi, James E. Osage County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):11
2004 Gubanyi, James E. Wilson County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):12
2004 Holloway, Alisha K. Polyploid origins, experimental evolution of gene duplicates, and duplication and divergence of reproductive genes. Dissertation. University of Texas, Austin. 78pp.
2004 Schmidt, Curtis J. Geographic distribution: Hyla chrysoscelis/Hyla versicolor. Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):13
2005 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2005 fall field trip [to Crawford County]. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (16):19-21
2006 Altig, Ronald, Roy W. McDiarmid, Kimberly A. Nichols, and Paul C. Ustach Tadpoles of the United States and Canada: A Tutorial and Key Electronic files accessible at http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/tadpole/. Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD, USA. ():
2006 Anderson, Lewis R. and Joseph A. Arruda. Land use and anuran biodiversity in southeast Kansas, USA. Amphibian and Reptile Conservation 4(1):46-59
2006 Holloway, Alisha K., David C. Cannatella, H. Carl Gerhardt, and David M. Hillis. Polyploids with different origins and ancestors form a single sexual polyploid species. The American Naturalist 167(4):E88-E101
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2006 Wrijenhoek, Robert C. Polyploid hybrids: Multiple origins of a treefrog species. Current Biology 16(7):R245-R247
2009 Miller, Larry L. Geographic distribution. Hyla chrysoscelis (Cope's Gray Treefrog). Journal of Kansas Herpetology (30):11
2009 Murrow, Daniel G. KHS 2009 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (29):42769
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
2010 Miller, Larry L. 2010 Investigation of the Checkered Garter Snake in Kansas with notes on other Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles encountered. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 31pp.
2010 Murrow, Daniel G. Kansas Herpetological Society spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (33):2-3
2011 Houck, Mike. Fort Riley Herpetofaunal Survey for 2011. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (39):9
2011 McMartin, D. Chris. Herp Count: Fort Leavenworth Herpetofaunal Survey for 2011. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (39):8-9
2011 McMartin, David C. U. S. Army 2011 Fort Leavenworth Herpetofaunal Survey: 23 April - 09 May 2011. Privately printed, Leavenworth, Kansas. 33pp.
2011 Mitchell, Joseph C. and Christopher A. Paige. Advertisement call and distribution of the treefrogs Hyla chrysoscelis and Hyla versicolor in Virginia. Virginia Journal of Science 62(4):139-148
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Spring Field Trip to Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (38):2-4
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2013 Bass, Neil The Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Project: For the river, for you, and for herps. Collinsorum 2(1/2):10-11
2013 Bogart, James P. and K. Bi. Genetic and genomic interactions of animals with different ploidy levels. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 140(2-4):117–136
2013 Mardis, Dexter and Kevin Scott. 2013 Kansas Herpetofaunal Counts. Collinsorum 2(3/4):7
2013 Miller, Larry L. Wellington Lake Herpetological Survey. Collinsorum 2(1/2):12
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Fall Field Trip to Atchison County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Spring Field Trip to Bourbon County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):3
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Fall Field Trip to Butler County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):6
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Spring Field Trip to Schermerhorn Park, Cherokee County. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2014 McMartin, D. Chris. Fort Leavenworth Heretofaunal Survey for 2013. Collinsorum 3(1):10
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS Fall Field Trip to Woodson County. Collinsorum 3(2-4):12
2015 Bass, Neil. Herpetological (Frog and Turtle) Inventories along the Missouri River in Kansas. Collinsorum 4(1):5-9
2015 Taggart, Travis W. Fall Field Trip Held In Washington County. Collinsorum 4(3):4
2016 Duellman, William E., Angela B. Marion, and S. Blair Hedges. Phylogenetics, classification, and biogeography of the treefrogs (Amphibia: Anura: Arboranae). Zootaxa 4101(1):109
2016 Pittman, Galen L., Henry S. Fitch, and W. Dean Kettle Vertebrate animals on the Fitch Natural History Reservation (1948-2002) Kansas Biological Survey Report Number 188, Lawrence. 48pp.
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2016 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Summer field trip to Caney River, Chautauqua County, Kansas. Collinsorum 5(2-3):4-5
2017 Snyder, Ariel Survey Of Anuran Chytrid (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in Kansas and the Influence of Anuran Life History in Occurrence. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 53pp.
2017 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2017 KHS Spring Field Trip to Elk County, Kansas. Collinsorum 6(2-3):6-8
2017 Taggart, Travis W. and J. Daren Riedle. A Pocket Guide to Kansas Amphibians, Turtles and Lizards. Great Plains Nature Center, Wichita, Kansas. 69pp.
2018 Carlson, Zane A. and Keith Geluso. Second sighting of Cope’s Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) in Buffalo County, Nebraska Collinsorum 7(1):18
2018 Houck, Mike. Herp Count: Fort Riley Military Installation Collinsorum 7(1):17
2019 Zhang, Jia-Yong, Bryan E. Luu, Dan-Na Yua, Le-Ping Zhang, Rasha Al-attar, and Kenneth B. Storey The complete mitochondrial genome of Dryophytes versicolor: Phylogenetic relationship among Hylidae and mitochondrial protein-coding gene expression in response to freezing and anoxia. International Journal of Biological Macromolecules 132():461-469
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
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9/15/2020 4:22:50 PM