An adult Red-bellied Snake from Jefferson County, Kansas. © Suzanne L. Collins, CNAH.
An adult Red-bellied Snake (lower) and an adult DeKay's Brownsnake (above) from Miami County, Kansas. © Suzanne L. Collins, CNAH.
An adult Red-bellied Snake from Jefferson County, Kansas. © Suzanne L. Collins.
An adult Red-bellied Snake from Cherokee County, Kansas. © Jenn Rader.
An adult Red-bellied Snake from Schermerhorn Park, Cherokee County, Kansas. Image © Andrew George.
An adut Red-bellied Snake from Jefferson County, KS. © Lisa Wehrly.
REPTILIA (Reptiles) SQUAMATA (PART) (Snakes) NATRICIDAE (Harmless Egg-Retaining Snakes)

Red-bellied Snake
Storeria occipitomaculata (Storer 1839)
stŏr-ər-ē-ă — ŏk-sĭp-ĭ-tō-măk-ū-lā-tă


Conservation Status:

State: Kansas Species in Need of Conservation (SINC)

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S2 - Imperiled
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None
Diagnosis:
HARMLESS. The Red-bellied Snake is characterized by keeled scales, a divided anal scale, and distinctive colors and patterns. The head, body, and tail may be slate gray with two thin darker stripes on each side of the back or reddish brown with indistinct darker stripes. The belly may be bright orange-red or jet black. Any combinations of dorsal and belly colors occur. Three light spots occur on the neck, and some specimens have a faint light stripe down the middle of the back. Adult males have longer-tails than females. Females grow larger than males.
Adults normally attain 20.3-25.4 cm (8-10 inches) in total length. The largest specimen from Kansas is a female (KU 28750) from Miami County with a total length of 30.5 cm (12 inches) collected by A. Byron Leonard in 1950. The maximum length throughout the range is 40.6 cm (16 inches) (Powell et al., 2016).

Distribution:
This snake is currently known from records along the eastern two tiers of counties in Kansas.
There is a record from Phillips County (AMNH 3380, Long Island; collected in 1884) that may represent a relictual population (see Remarks). See Allen (1895) for a discussion of the 1894 field season by the collector at Long Island, however, it is not the 1884 date as on the collection print-out provided by AMNH. Other relictual populations of this species occur nearby in central Nebraska (along the Platte River) and also in the Black Hills region of South Dakota and Wyoming.
A record from Hamilton County (KU 2355) was collected in June 1902 but lacked specific locality data as well as the name of the collector. The records for Phillips and Hamilton counties were mapped by Smith (1950, 1956), though he considered them questionable and in need of verification. They were not mapped by Brumwell (1933) and were rejected by Collins (1974, 1982, 1993) and Collins et al. (2010). Lynch (1985) and Peyton (1989) based on an isolated record from south-central Nebraska, and a colony of these snakes discovered along the Platte River respectively, speculated that the "western records" rejected by Collins might be valid.
Currently, the following areas are designated critical for Red-bellied Snakes:
(1) All suitable habitat occurring within the section of Cherokee and Crawford counties east of U.S. Highway 69 at the Kansas-Oklahoma border (Sec. 18, T35S, R24E), extending north to State Highway K-7 (Sec. 7, T33S, R24E), then continuing north to the northern border of Crawford County (Sec. 30, T27S, R24E).
(2) All suitable woodland habitat within Douglas, Jefferson, Johnson, Leavenworth, and Wyandotte counties.
(,   Museum Voucher) (,   Observation) (,   Literature Record) (,   iNat Record), (  Fossil)
Open icons are questionable records; Click on a marker to view details.
Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 82
    Records 
  • 56
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 26
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Anderson (1); Atchison (2); Cherokee (30); Crawford (2); Douglas (12); Franklin (11); Hamilton (1); Jefferson (12); Johnson (1); Leavenworth (1); Linn (1); Miami (6); Phillips (1); Unknown (1);

Fossil History:
Fossils from the Cragin Quarry Local Fauna of Meade County (Pleistocene: Sangamonian) (Hay 1917; Etheridge 1958; Etheridge 1960, Tihen 1960; Tihen 1962; Brattstrom 1967; Preston 1979; Holman 1995) are assignable to this taxon (species indeterminate).

Natural History:
The Red-bellied Snake inhabits woodlands with dense leaf litter. Gloyd (1928) collected this species beneath rotten logs, among leaves, and under boards in sandstone woodlands in Franklin County. He found two specimens basking in the sun in a dry stream bed and another actively crawling about during the day. In Miami County, Gloyd (1932) discovered two specimens in woods near a river and near a lake. Collins (1974) found it beneath rocks on wooded hillsides in Douglas and Jefferson counties.
This snake is active from March to October. Little is known of its daily habits. Trapido (1944) suggested that it may be nocturnal; however, this snake's daily cycle probably shifts with seasonal temperature like the Brown Snake. Al Kamb (pers. comm., 1974) obtained an adult male active at 2050 hours on 8 July in western Douglas County at an air temperature of 85°F. Collins (1982) found four of these snakes in Cherokee County from 20 March to 22 May; two were beneath logs at forest edge. During winter, this species retires beneath the ground and remains inactive until spring emergence.
Mating occurs both in spring and fall. When fall matings occur, the sperm are retained by the female through the winter. Courtship is unknown in Kansas. Each female gives birth to young during late July, August, or early September. The number of young per litter ranges from one to eighteen (Fitch, 1985), with an average of eight. Collins (1982) discovered a gravid female beneath a log at forest edge in Cherokee County on 10 April. Eric M. Rundquist (pers. comm., 1989; Collins, 1993) recorded a litter of eighteen young born on 7 July by a female from northeastern Kansas.
This snake prefers small forest slugs but will eat snails and earthworms also (Collins, 1993).
Predators of Red-bellied Snake include birds, mammals, and other snakes (Collins, 1993).

Occurrence Activity:
Number of Unique Obervations (=days): 46; Range: 17 Mar to 08 Nov
Remarks:
The Red-bellied Snake was first reported from Kansas by Cragin (1880) from Douglas County and also "Kansas". The earliest specimen (AMNH 3380) was collected by Walter W. Granger at Long Island (Phillips County) on 25 September 1884 (See J. A. Allen's "List of mammals collected in the Black Hills region of South Dakota and in western Kansas, 1895, by Mr. Walter W. Granger, with field notes by the collector" (Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 7(7)). It discusses the 1894 field season, not the 1884 date as on the collection printout provided by AMNH. The expedition collected at Long Island, in Phillips County from 14 September through 4 November on its return trip from several localities in and around the Black Hills of South Dakota, where this species is locally abundant. In need of corroboration.). Lynch (1985) and Peyton (1989) suggested that AMNH R-3380 may be valid due to specimens collected along the western Central Platte River Valley of south-central Nebraska. Schaaf and Caven (2023) provided the nearest observation to AMNH R-3380 in Nebraska (~70 kilometers [43.5 miles]).
The Red-bellied Snake is small, and their small size coupled with secretive habits makes them difficult to turn up even during optimal times of the year (most Kansas specimens have been taken in April).
This species has historically been reported to be a denizen of deep woods where it occurs. Most specimens are known from areas with substantial rock outcrops and leaf litter in association with woodlands. However, a few specimens are known from localities several hundred meters to several kilometers from significant woodlands. It is currently unclear whether our understanding of the distribution and habitat of this taxon represents a collector's bias, or if the Red-bellied Snake is a more wide-ranging habitat generalist. Future studies that attempt to passively collect (drift fences and pitfalls) this species in a variety of habitats should provide the answer.
Throughout most of its range, this species is a well-known urban inhabitant often turning up in residential areas. Minimal effort has been spent searching or monitoring residential habitats in Kansas.
Burt and Hoyle (1935) reported on a specimen discovered by Hobart M. Smith under a stone in a deeply wooded area near Spring River on 4 April 1931, at a point about 2 miles north of Baxter Springs, Cherokee County.
Platt et al. (1974) recommended close scrutiny of lumbering operations, restriction of large scale lumbering, and discontinued use of persistent pesticides in areas where this snake occurs. The Red-bellied Snake was listed as a Kansas Threatened species in 1987 and downlisted to SINC in 2015.
Based on a captive specimen, Snider and Bowler (1992) reported a maximum longevity for this snake of four years and seven months.

Bibliography:
1880 Cragin, Francis W. A preliminary catalogue of Kansas reptiles and batrachians Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 7():112-123
Also listed the Scarlet Snake (Cemophora coccinea) [=Ophibolus doliatus var. coccineus] and Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) [=Spelerpes ruber] from Kansas.
1894 Allen, Joel A. List of mammals collected in the Black Hills region of South Dakota and in western Kansas by Mr. Walter W. Granger, with field notes by the collector. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 7(7):259-274
1903 Branson, Edwin B. Snakes of Kansas Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 41pp.
Describes all snake species reported from Kansas, considering doubtful those species that the author has not encountered himself. This list contains twenty-nine valid species. Collections examined included State University (KU), State House, Washburn College (WU), Ottawa University, State Normal School (ESU), State Agricultural College (KSU), and several high schools in Kansas. Examined the material available to Mozley (1878) and determined that of the thirty-three species listed, only twenty-three species were valid currently. And that Cragin's (1880) list of thirty-two species included eight specimens on the authority of Mozley that this author could not verify in any collection.
1904 Branson, Edwin B. Snakes of Kansas. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 2(13):353-430
1929 Taylor, Edward H. A revised checklist of the snakes of Kansas. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 19(5):53-62
1932 Gloyd, Howard K. The herpetological fauna of the Pigeon Lake Region, Miami County, Kansas. Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan 15():389-408
First record of Notophthalmus viridescens from Kansas. Second record (after the type locality) of Pseudacris crucifer from Kansas.
1933 Stejneger, Leonhard and Thomas Barbour. A Checklist of North American Amphibians and Reptiles. 3rd Edition. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. pp.
Reference to Kansas is the listed range of several species.
1934 Burt, Charles E. and W. L. Hoyle. Additional records of the reptiles of the central prairie region of the United States. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 37():193-216
1936 Brumwell, Malcolm J. Distributional records of the reptilia and amphibians of Kansas. Privately printed, . 22pp.
County dot maps of the Kansas herpetofauna. This work has been attributed to have been written around 1933, but that may be in error. 
Hypsiglena jani was not known from Kansas until Claude W. Hibbard collected three specimens on the Stevenson Ranch in north-central Clark County (above Clark State Lake) during June 1936 (Hibbard, 1937). Brumwell plotted this locality, which leads me to believe that the 1936 would have been the earliest date this manuscript could have been written.
1941 Mansueti, Romeo. A descriptive catalogue of the amphibians and reptiles found in and around Baltimore City, Maryland, within a radius of twenty miles. Proceedings of the Natural History Society of Maryland 7():1-53
1944 Trapido, Harold. The snakes of the genus Storeria. American Midland Naturalist 31(1):1-84
Includes localities for Kansas specimens.
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
The first modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table and text say 97 on p. 10) and 13 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies.
1953 Schmidt, Karl P. A Check List of North American Amphibians and Reptiles. 6th Edition. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois. 280pp.
Schmidt's first edition of his standardized checklist to North American amphibians and reptiles. Includes several specific references to Kansas in the range descriptions.
1956 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. Second edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (9):1-356
Hobart M. Smith's updated second edition of his first (1950) modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table says 97 on p. 10; text says 98 on p. 10) and 11 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies. The second edition has updated taxonomy, added Plestiodon laticeps, and removed Eurycea tynerensis.
1967 Choate, Jerry R. Wildlife in the Wakarusa Watershed of Northeastern Kansas. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 46pp.
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
Joseph T. Collins first Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Smith 1956)>
1974 Platt, Dwight R., Joseph T. Collins, and Ray E. Ashton, Jr. Rare, endangered and extirpated species in Kansas. II. Amphibians and reptiles. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 76(3):185-192
The initial initiative to determine population and conservation status of Kansas' amphibians and reptiles based on our understanding at the time. A lot has changed regarding our increased knowledge on all the listed species.
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Ashton, Ray E., Jr., Stephen R. Edwards, and George R. Pisani. Endangered and threatened amphibians and reptiles in the United States. Herpetological Circulars (5):65
1977 Perry, Janice. Kansas herps needed. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (18):2-3
List of Kansas amphibians and reptiles desired for the SSAR/HL meeting to be held 7-13 August 1977.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Report to the Kansas Fish and Game Commission on the status of three amphibians in southeastern Kansas. Kansas Fish and Game Commission, Pratt. 57pp.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
Joseph T. Collins second Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1974)>
1984 Brown, Kenneth L. Pomona: A plains village variant in eastern Kansas and western Missouri. Dissertation. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 519pp.
1984 Secor, Stephen M. and Charles C. Carpenter. Distribution maps of Oklahoma reptiles. Oklahoma Herpetological Society Special Publication (3):1-57
1985 Irwin, Kelly J. Field trip time again. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (59):1-2
1985 Fitch, Henry S. Variation in clutch and litter size in New World reptiles. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (76):1-76
1985 Lynch, John D. Annotated checklist of the amphibians and reptiles of Nebraska. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Science 13():33-57
1986 Layher, William G., Ken L. Brunson, J.Schaefer, Marvin D. Schwilling, and R. D. Wood. Summary of nongame task force actions relative to developing three species lists: Species in Need of Conservation, Threatened, and Endangered. Kansas Fish and Game Commission, Pratt. 27pp.
1988 Busby, William H. The Kansas Natural Heritage Program: Taking stock of Kansas' natural heritage. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (71):9-12
1989 Simmons, John E. Endangered and threatened in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (75):4-5
1989 Peyton, M. M. Geographic distribution: Storeria occipitomaculata. Herpetological Review 20():13
1990 Lardie, Richard L. Kansas threatened species and protection of the Gypsum Hills habitat. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (80):14-15
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Fitch, Henry S. Reptiles and amphibians of the Kansas ecological reserves. Pages 71-74 in Ecology and Hydrology of Kansas Ecological Reserves and the Baker Wetlands. Multidisciplinary Guidebook 4. Kansas Academy of Science, Lawrence, Kansas. pp.
1992 Taggart, Travis W. KHS field trips. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (91):3
1993 Freeman, Craig C. and William H. Busby. A survey for endangered and threatened species on the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant, Johnson County, Kansas. Report No. 54. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 115pp.
1993 Fitzgerald, Eve C. and Charles H. Nilon. Testing the accuracy of an HSI model in and urban county. ():16
1993 Miller, Larry L. and Joseph T. Collins. History, distribution and habitat requirements for three species of threatened reptiles in eastern Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. 29pp.
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
Joseph T. Collins third Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1982)>
1994 Fitzgerald, Eve C. Habitat Suitability Index Models for Three Threatened Snake Species in an Urban County. Thesis. University of Missouri, Columbia. pp.
1994 Fitzgerald, Eve C. and Charles Nilon. Classification of habitats for endangered and threatened species in Wyandotte County, Kansas Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 98pp.
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. 1994 Field Trip Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (95):3-4
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (97):5-14
See, 1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Additions and corrections [to the results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994]. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):4.
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. A Key to Amphibians & Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 131pp.
1998 Gamble, Jerre. Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartford, Kansas. 91pp.
1998 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1997. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (111):12-14
1998 Mosier, Dan and Joseph T. Collins. Geographic Distribution. Storeria occipitomaculata. Herpetological Review 29(2):116
1999 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas Herpetological Society herp counts: A 10 year summary and evaluation. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (115):42962
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2002 Ernst, Carl H. Storeria occipitomaculata (Storer) Red-bellied Snake . Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (759):1-8
2003 Freeman, Craig C. A natural areas inventory of the Ft. Leavenworth Military Reservation, Leavenworth County, Kansas. II. Open-file Report No. 117. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence, Kansas. 199pp.
2003 Suleiman, G. Fort Riley herpetofaunal count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):11-12
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2008 Industrial Economics, Incorporated. Cherokee County: Restoration Plan / Environmental Assessment. Prepared for: US Department of the Interior, US Fish and Wildlife Service. Industrial Economics, Incorporated, Cambridge, MA. 138pp.
2008 Taggart, Travis W. A Survey of Two Rarely-Seen Northeast Kansas Snakes. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 45pp.
2008 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2008 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (25):2-3
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
Joseph T. Collins fourth Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1993)>
2010 Pisani, George R. and William Busby. Smooth earth snake and redbelly snake population survey. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (33):7
2011 Busby, William. Ecology of the Smooth Earth Snake (Virginia valeriae) and Redbelly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata)  in Northeastern Kansas. Open-file Report No. 172 Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 37pp.
2011 Pisani, George R. and William H. Busby. Ecology of the Smooth Earth Snake (Virginia valeriae) and Redbelly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata) in Northeastern Kansas. Report to the Open-file Report No. 172. Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism, Pratt. 38pp.
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2012 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada: Second Edition, Revised and Updated. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 152pp.
2012 Busby, William. Habitat Associations and Ecological Niche Modeling in Eastern Forest Species: Annual Report, Year 1 - August 15, 2011 to May 30, 2012. Project T‐30‐R‐1. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence, Kansas. 4pp.
2012 Ernst, Carl H. Storeria. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (900):14
2012 Pisani, George R. and William H. Busby. Storeria occipitomaculata (Red-bellied Snake). Behavior: Lip-curling Collinsorum 1(2/3):6
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Spring Field Trip to Schermerhorn Park, Cherokee County. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2014 Busby, William H., George R. Pisani, E. Townsend Peterson, and Narayani Barve. Ecological Studies of the Smooth Earth Snake and Redbelly Snake, and Niche Modeling of Forest Species in Eastern Kansas. Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism, Pratt, Kansas. 68pp.
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Recent scientific and standard English name changes effecting the Kansas herpetofauna. Collinsorum 3(2-4):9-10
2015 Rohweder, Megan R. Kansas Wildlife Action Plan. Ecological Services Section, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism in cooperation with the Kansas Biological Survey. 176pp.
2015 Haines-Eitzen, Eli, John Haines-Eitzen, Ben Haines-Eitzen, Justin Lee, and David Lee, and George R. Pisani. Effects of drought on two small Kansas snakes. IRCF Reptiles and Amphibians 22(4):153–155
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2016 Pyron, R. Alexander, Felisa W. Hsieh, Alan R. Lemmon, Emily M. Lemmon, and Catriona R. Hendry. Integrating phylogenomic and morphological data to assess candidate species-delimitation models in brown and red-bellied snakes (Storeria). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 2016():1-13
2017 Crother, Brian I. (editor) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding. Eighth edition. Herpetological Circulars (43):1-102
2017 Tye, S. P., Keith Geluso, and M. J. Harner. Early emergence and seasonality of the Red-bellied Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata) along the Platte River in south-central Nebraska, USA. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences 37():11–17
2018 Davis-Berg, Elizabeth, Daniel P. Beintema, Meghan O. Rock, and Brittan A. Wilson. Terrestrial gastropods present at Breidenthal Biological Reserve, an eastern deciduous forest in Baldwin Woods Forest Preserve in Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 121(3-4):361-368
2019 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Third Edition. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 192pp.
2019 Riedle, J. Daren. The truth about snakes. Kansas Wildlife and Parks Magazine July/August():18-21
2020 Daniel, Richard E. and Brian S. Edmond. Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2019. Privately printed, Columbia, Missouri. 86pp.
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
2020 Hullinger, Allison, Zackary Cordes, Daren Riedle, and William Stark. Habitat assessment of the Broad-headed Skink (Plestiodon laticeps) and the associated squamate community in eastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 123(1-2):137-150
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Cherokee County: KHS-2020-03 Collinsorum 9(3):12
2021 Busby, William H., Barve, Narayani, Cobos, Marlon, and Peterson, A. Townsend. Effects of landscape history on current geographic distributions of four species of reptiles and amphibians in Kansas. The Southwestern Naturalist 66(2):157-165
2022 Somma, Louis A. Provenance of the Red-bellied Snake, Storeria occipitomaculata (Storer) (Squamata: Natricidae), collected from eastern Nebraska, U.S.A., in the 19th Century. Breviora (575):1-10
2023 Schaaf, Matthew and Andrew J. Caven. Occurrence of the Red-bellied Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata) on the margins of a disjunct range. Reptiles & Amphibians 30(e18216):1-9
2023 Nunez, Leroy, Levi N Gray, David Weisrock, and Frank T Burbrink. The phylogenomic and biogeographic history of the Gartersnakes, Watersnakes, and Allies (Natricidae: Thamnophiini). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 186(5:107844):12
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University