An adult Broad-banded Copperhead from Chautauqua County, Kansas (iNat#: 108734402). Image by iNat user (beverly77).
An adult Broad-banded Copperhead from Chautauqua County, Kansas (iNat#: 111603211). Image by iNat user (Brian Kilmer: facetious76).
An adult Broad-banded Copperhead from Cowley County, Kansas (iNat#: 78419341). Image by iNat user (Emily Cooper George: mrsg222).
An adult Broad-banded Copperhead from Cowley County, Kansas (iNat#: 85059268). Image by iNat user (Lizzy Cramer: mycologygirl).
An adult Broad-banded Copperhead from Montgomery County, Kansas (iNat#: 135369978). Image by iNat user (Shawn Hinderliter: shawn_hinderliter).
REPTILIA (Reptiles) SQUAMATA (PART) (Snakes) CROTALIDAE (Pit Vipers)

Broad-banded Copperhead
Agkistrodon laticinctus (Gloyd & Conant 1934)
ăg-kĭs-trō-dŏn — lă-tĭ-sĭnk-tŭs


Conservation Status:

State: None

Federal: None
NatureServe State: S5 - Secure
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None
Diagnosis:
DANGEROUSLY VENOMOUS (a threat to life or limb): The Broad-banded Copperhead is the only distinctly banded snake in Kansas with no rattle on its tail and a small pit on each side of its head between and slightly below the eye and nostril. This snake normally has a pattern of 7- 20 light-edged crossbands on its body; the bands may be nearly equal in width on the back and on the sides.
Broad-banded Copperheads vary in color from gray to light brown with dark gray or brown crossbands. The head may be gray, brown, or reddish. The belly is white with large dark gray, brown, or black blotches on its edges extending a short distance up onto the sides of the body.
Young specimens have yellowish tails. Adult male Broad-banded Copperheads grow much longer than females. 
The two species hybridize across much of Kansas.
Adults normally grow 56.0-91.5 cm (22- 36 inches) in total length. The largest specimen from Kansas is a male (KU 196643) from Jefferson County with a total length of 102.0 cm (40 inches) collected by Henry S. Fitch on 13 July 1984. The maximum length throughout the range is 134.6 cm (53 inches) (Powell et al., 2016). The maximum weight for a Kansas specimen is about 400 grams (14 ounces).

Distribution:
The two forms are broadly overlapping. Agkistrodon contortrix is found generally north and east of the Neosho River basin, where it is scarce and occurs in scattered populations. It enters the Flint Hills along rocky riparian corridors where there has been genetic admixture at some point in the past with the Broad-banded Copperhead.
Hybrids occur primarily between the Verdigris River and Walnut River drainages in Kansas.
Additionally, genetic hybrids were identified among the westernmost populations of the Eastern Copperhead (A. contortrix) along the Kansas and Neosho River drainages (Burbrink and Guiher, 2014).
Two 'pure' Eastern Copperheads were detected in Elk County and these outlier samples should be reexamined.
(,   Museum Voucher) (,   Observation) (,   Literature Record) (,   iNat Record), (  Fossil)
Open icons are questionable records; Click on a marker to view details.
Full range depicted by light shaded red area. Export Google Earth (.kml)
  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 318
    Records 
  • 283
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 35
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):
Butler (47); Chautauqua (37); Cowley (54); Elk (18); Greenwood (40); Montgomery (8); Sedgwick (1); Unknown (96); Wilson (6); Woodson (11);

Fossil History:
Pleistocene fossil specimens are known from Jewell County, well west of the range of this species today.
Fossils from the Cragin Quarry Local Fauna of Meade County (Pleistocene: Sangamonian) (Hay 1917; Etheridge 1958; Etheridge 1960, Tihen 1960; Tihen 1962; Brattstrom 1967; Preston 1979; Holman 1995) are assignable to this taxon.

Natural History:
Broad-banded Copperheads are found in open rocky woodland, woodland edge, and meadows with clumps of brush adjacent to woodland. Their pattern and color blend perfectly with forest leaf litter. This species is active from April to early November and has a preferred optimal temperature near 80°F. During the cool spring and fall months, this snake is active only during the day and normally is found coiled on rocky hillsides or forest floors where it awaits the approach of prey.
In the summer, Broad-banded Copperheads become nocturnal and prowl for food, aided by their night vision and the two sensory pits between the eyes and nostrils. These pits detect the body heat of warm-blooded prey such as mice. Broad-banded Copperheads have home ranges, but males tend to wander in larger areas than females. Home ranges vary from eight to 25 acres. Because of their shy, retiring disposition and camouflage pattern, these snakes easily exist in reasonably large numbers near areas of heavy human population. The few people annually bitten by these snakes are normally the victims of accidents and definitely not the victims of aggressive, dangerous animals. During the fall, this snake returns to wooded hilltop rock outcrops with a southern exposure used in previous years and retires deep beneath the ground to avoid the cold temperatures of winter.
This snake breeds from April to August, with a peak of activity in April and May just after spring emergence from winter inactivity. Adult male Broad-banded Copperheads are among those snakes which infrequently engage in combat dances. A typical combat dance involves two males facing each other with their heads and the front of their bodies raised off the ground. They come together so their bellies are firmly adpressed. Then they slowly. intertwine their necks with writhing movements, until suddenly one male hurls the other to the ground with a quick body contraction. The combat dance evidently establishes dominance of one male over another. Many female Broad-banded Copperheads bear young only every other year. Courtship and mating have not been observed adequately and presumably occur at night. The young are born venomous and number from one to fourteen per litter (Fitch, 1985), with an average of about five. Females give birth in August, September, and October.
Broad-banded Copperheads feed on insects (particularly cicadas), frogs, toads, lizards, small birds, and other snakes. They are particularly fond of rodents. Young Broad-banded Copperheads may use their yellowish tails as lures to attract prey such as small frogs and toads.
Predators of Broad-banded Copperheads include large birds, mammals, and larger snakes, but people are its chief enemy.

Occurrence Activity:
Number of Unique Obervations (=days): 86; Range: 30 Mar to 23 Oct
Remarks:
First reported in Kansas by Branson(1903: thesis, 1904; publication) based on a specimen available from Montgomery County. The earliest extant specimens (KU 1489) collected in Montgomery County in July of 1911 (no other information).
Specimens are needed along the western periphery of its range in Kansas to better define the limits of its range there. Additional specimens are also desirable from the Drift Hills in the northeast and throughout the Neosho River drainage basin.
Burt (1935) reported a specimen that was taken 5 miles east of Rock, Cowley County, Kansas, on 16 April 1934.
Gloyd (1969) described Agkistrodon contortrix phaeogaster. United States National Museum no. 165955, adult male, received from Dr. Henry S. Fitch, July 1960; locality 10 miles south of McLouth, Jefferson County, Kansas; collector not stated. He went on to define its distribution as "A. c. phaeogaster occupies the major portion of the Marais des Cygnes-Osage River drainage system in eastern Kansas and central Missouri. It intergrades with A. c. laticinctus in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma... ".
Burbrink and Guiher (2014) recognized two species A. contortrix (eastern-most populations) and A. laticinctus (western populations) in the United States. The two species mix over eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma. And, based on relatively extensive sampling in Kansas they discovered that the entire range in Kansas was an admixture of the two species. Because the two species cannot be differentiated in Kansas without examining their genetics, the complex has been grouped into one account.
Based on a captive specimen, Snider and Bowler (1992) reported a maximum longevity for this species of 29 years, ten months, and six days.

Bibliography:
1766 Linné, Carl von (=Linneaus). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tomus I. [The system of nature through the three kingdoms of nature, according to classes, orders, genera, species with characters, differences, synonyms, places. Volume I.] Laurentii Salvii, Stockholm, Holmiae, Editio duodecima, reformata (12th Edition). 1-532pp.
Contains the original descriptions of Lacerta 6-lineata (=Aspidoscelis sexlineata) page 364, Sistrurus miliarius page 372, Boa contortrix (=Agkistrodon contortrix): page 373, Coluber striatulus (=Haldea striatula) page 275, Coluber punctatus (=Diadophis punctatus) page 376, and Coluber aestivus (=Opheodrys aestivus) page 387.
1799 Palisot de Beauvois, Ambroise M. F. J. Memoir on Amphibia. Serpents. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society 4():362-381
1903 Branson, Edwin B. Snakes of Kansas Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 41pp.
Describes all snake species reported from Kansas, considering doubtful those species that the author has not encountered himself. This list contains twenty-nine valid species. Collections examined included State University (KU), State House, Washburn College (WU), Ottawa University, State Normal School (ESU), State Agricultural College (KSU), and several high schools in Kansas. Examined the material available to Mozley (1878) and determined that of the thirty-three species listed, only twenty-three species were valid currently. And that Cragin's (1880) list of thirty-two species included eight specimens on the authority of Mozley that this author could not verify in any collection.
1904 Branson, Edwin B. Snakes of Kansas. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 2(13):353-430
1911 Hurter, Julius. Herpetology of Missouri. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 20(5):59-274
1913 Crow, H. E. Some trematodes of Kansas snakes. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 7(4):125-136
1925 Linsdale, Jean M. Land Vertebrates of a Limited Area in Eastern Kansas. Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 312pp.
1927 Burt, Charles E. An annotated list of the amphibians and reptiles of Riley County, Kansas. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (189):12
Accounts on forty species known from the vicinity of Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas. There have been several scientific names changes since publication, which is understandable... however, some usages cannot be explained by subsequent taxonomic reappraisals(e.g.  Gastrophryne carolinensis for Gastrophryne olivacea). The writer lists Eumeces (=Plestiodon) obsoletus and E. guttulatus yet correctly reasoning that the latter is the young of the former. Within the account of Tantilla gracilis (a common form) the writer mentions that T. nigriceps was reported from Riley County by Branson (1904) but that the specimens at Kansas State were absent at the time of publication. The Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis) was first reported from Riley County by Branson (1904) and is reported by the writer based on a specimen in the museum at Kansas State University by Professor E. A. Popenoe. The Prairie Rattlesnake is not currently native to Riley County, and closest reliable localities are 150 to the west.
1927 Linsdale, Jean M. Amphibians and reptiles of Doniphan County, Kansas. Copeia 1927(164):75-81
1928 Gloyd, Howard K. The amphibians and reptiles of Franklin County, Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 31():115-141
1929 Gloyd, Howard K. Studies on the breeding habits and young of the Copperhead, Agkistrodon mokasen Beauvois, with some observations on ovoviviparity. Thesis. Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, Kansas. 49pp.
1929 Taylor, Edward H. A revised checklist of the snakes of Kansas. University of Kansas Science Bulletin 19(5):53-62
1932 Gloyd, Howard K. The herpetological fauna of the Pigeon Lake Region, Miami County, Kansas. Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan 15():389-408
First record of Notophthalmus viridescens from Kansas. Second record (after the type locality) of Pseudacris crucifer from Kansas.
1933 Burt, Charles E. Some distributional and ecological records of Kansas reptiles. Transactions of the Academy of Science St. Louis 26():186-208
1934 Gloyd, Howard K. and Roger Conant. The broad-banded copperhead: A new subspecies of Agkistrodon mokasen. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan (283):1-5
1934 Gloyd, Howard K. Studies on the breeding habits and young of the Copperhead, Agkistrodon mokasen Beauvois. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters 19():587-604
1934 Burt, Charles E. and W. L. Hoyle. Additional records of the reptiles of the central prairie region of the United States. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 37():193-216
1935 Burt, Charles E. Further records of the ecology and distribution of amphibians and reptiles in the middle west. American Midland Naturalist 16(3):311-366
1936 Hurd, Myron Alec. The reptiles of Cherokee County, Kansas. Thesis. Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas. 103pp.
Under the supervision of thesis adviser Harry H. Hall. Report on 38 species (8 turtles, 7 lizards, and 23 snakes)... most unsubstantiated. Interesting inclusion are Crotalus horridus, Crotalus viridis, Kinosternon subrubrum, Opheodrys vernalis, and Phrynosoma cornutum.
1936 Brumwell, Malcolm J. Distributional records of the reptilia and amphibians of Kansas. Privately printed, . 22pp.
County dot maps of the Kansas herpetofauna. This work has been attributed to have been written around 1933, but that may be in error. 
Hypsiglena jani was not known from Kansas until Claude W. Hibbard collected three specimens on the Stevenson Ranch in north-central Clark County (above Clark State Lake) during June 1936 (Hibbard, 1937). Brumwell plotted this locality, which leads me to believe that the 1936 would have been the earliest date this manuscript could have been written.
1938 Gloyd, Howard K. and Roger Conant. The subspecies of the copperhead, Agkistrodon mokasen Beauvois. Bulletin of the Chicago Academy of Sciences 5(7):163-166
1941 Schmidt, Karl Peterson and D. D. Davis. Field Book of Snakes of the United States and Canada. C.P. Putnam and Sons, New York. 365pp.
1941 Mansueti, Romeo. A descriptive catalogue of the amphibians and reptiles found in and around Baltimore City, Maryland, within a radius of twenty miles. Proceedings of the Natural History Society of Maryland 7():1-53
1942 Hudson, G. E. The amphibians and reptiles of Nebraska. Nebraska Conservation Bulletin 24():1-146
1943 Gloyd, Howard K. and Roger Conant. A synopsis of the American forms of Agkistrodon (copperheads and moccasins). Bulletin of the Chicago Academy of Sciences 7(2):147-170
1946 Gloyd, Howard K. Some rattlesnake dens of South Dakota. The Chicago Naturalist 9(4):87-97
1950 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Miscellaneous Publication (2):336
The first modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table and text say 97 on p. 10) and 13 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies.
1951 Wolfenbarger, Keith. A. Systematic and Biological Studies on North American Chiggers of the genus Eutrombicula (Acarina, Trombiculidae). Thesis. University of Kansas, Lawrence. 77pp.
1951 Brumwell, Malcolm J. An ecological survey of the Fort Leavenworth Military Reservation American Midland Naturalist 45(1):187-231
Published posthumously. Lieutenant Brumwell died December 14, 1941, as a result of injuries incurred during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. This paper is a condensed version of his thesis for the Master's degree.
1951 Freiburg, Richard E. An ecological study of the narrow-mouthed toad (Microhyla) in northeastern Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 54(3):374-386
1952 Shockley, Clarence H. Some aspects of the life history and reproductive physiology of the water snake, Natrix sipedon sipedon. Dissertation. Indiana Univeristy, Bloomington, Indiana. 126pp.
1952 Stickel, William H. Venomous snakes of the United States and treatment of their bites. Wildlife Leaflet (339):34
1953 Schmidt, Karl P. A Check List of North American Amphibians and Reptiles. 6th Edition. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois. 280pp.
Schmidt's first edition of his standardized checklist to North American amphibians and reptiles. Includes several specific references to Kansas in the range descriptions.
1956 Smith, Hobart M. Handbook of Amphibians and Reptiles of Kansas. Second edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (9):1-356
Hobart M. Smith's updated second edition of his first (1950) modern herpetology of Kansas. Includes locality dot maps within individual species accounts. Reports 96 species from Kansas (table says 97 on p. 10; text says 98 on p. 10) and 11 "probable but unverified" species and subspecies. The second edition has updated taxonomy, added Plestiodon laticeps, and removed Eurycea tynerensis.
1956 Loomis, Richard B. The chigger mites of Kansas (Acarina, Trombiculidae). University of Kansas Science Bulletin 37():1195-1443
Examined 2,628 Kansas reptiles of 48 species consisting of 27 turtles of 4 species, 1,736 lizards of 12 species and 892 snakes of 32 species for chiggers. Eleven species of chiggers were recovered from reptiles.
For amphibians, 1188 individuals of 21 species were examined. Five species of chigger mite were recovered from amphibians.
1959 Prophet, Carl W. An outline for conservation teaching in Kansas. Kansas School Naturalist 5(3):16
1959 Fitch, Henry S. A patternless phase of the Copperhead. Herpetologica 15(1):21-24
1960 McDuffie, George T. Studies on the ecology and life history of the Copperhead, Agkistrodon contortrix mokeson (Daudin), in Ohio. Dissertation. University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. 82pp.
1960 Fitch, Henry S. Autecology of the copperhead. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History 13(4):85-288
1961 Diener, Richard A. Notes on a bite of the broad-banded copperhead, Ancistrodon contortrix laticinctus Gloyd and Conant. Herpetologica 17(2):143-144
1962 Gish, Charles D. The Herpetofauna of Ellis County, Kansas. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 34pp.
1967 Gier, Herschel T. Vertebrates of the Flint Hills. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 70(1):51-59
1969 Gloyd, Howard K. Two additional subspecies of North American crotalid snakes, genus Agkistrodon. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 82():219-232
Description of Agkistrodon ccntortrix phaeogaster. United States National Museum no. 165955, adult male, received from Dr. Henry S. Fitch, July, 1960; locality 10 miles south of McLouth, Jefferson County, Kansas; collector not stated.
1970 Fitch, Henry S. Reproductive cycles in lizards and snakes. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Miscellaneous Publication (52):1-247
1972 McLeran, V. Copperhead. Kansas Fish and Game (29(2)):1-5
1974 Henderson, Robert W. Resource partitioning among snakes of the University of Kansas Natural History Reservation: A preliminary analysis. Milwaukee Public Museum Contributions in Biology and Geology (1):1-11
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
Joseph T. Collins first Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Smith 1956)>
1974 McLeran, V. The camouflaged Copperhead. Sports Afield (August):110-112
1974 Karns, Daryl, Ray E. Ashton, Jr., and Thomas Swearingen. Illustrated Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas: An Identification Manual. University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History Public Education Series(2):viii + 18
1976 Rundquist, Eric M. Field checklist (of) amphibians and reptiles of Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Caldwell, Janalee P. and Gregory. Glass. Vertebrates of the Woodson County State Fishing Lake and Game Management Area. Pages 62-76 in Preliminary inventory of the biota of Woodson County State Fishing Lake and Game Management Area. Report No. 5. State Biological Survey of Kansas, Lawrence. pp.
1976 Rickart, Eric A. A new horned lizard (Phrynosoma adinognathus) from the early Pleistocene of Meade County, Kansas, with comments on the herpetofauna of the Borchers locality. Herpetologica 32(1):64-67
Contains the original description of Phrynosoma adinognathus.
1977 Perry, Janice. KHS members achieve goal: Get Cottonmouth. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (21):3-4
1978 Curl, Richard L. Final Environmental Statement: Milford Lake Kansas operation and maintenance. US Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. 158pp.
Notable mentions: Spotted Salamander, Smooth Green Snake
1978 Fitch, Henry S. and E. Raymond Hall. A 20year record of succession on reseeded fields of tallgrass prairie on the Rockefeller Experimental Tract. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Special Publication (4):1-15
1978 Capron, Marty B. Notes on the possible occurrence of Broadbanded Copperheads in Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (26):4-6
1978 Perry, Janice. KHS successful at Miami County State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (27):5
1978 Collins, Joseph T. The Osage Copperhead. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Association Newsleter (7(2)):71-74
1978 Collins, Joseph T. and Janalee P. Caldwell. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1977. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 6():70-88
1979 Guarisco, Hank. Preliminary laboratory observations of predation by native Texas Garter Snakes upon hatchling Five-lined Skinks. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (32):7-8
1979 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1978. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 8():56-66
1980 Smith, Donald D. The Copperhead. AALAS Kansas City Branch News 3(2):8-10
1980 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1979. Technical Publication of the State Biological Survery of Kansas 9():1-11
1982 Fitch, Henry S. Resources of a snake community in prairie-woodland habitat of northeastern Kansas. Pages 83-97 in Herpetological communities: A symposium of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles and the Herpetologists League, August 1977.  Wildlife Research Reports 12. 239 pp. U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D. C. pp.
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
Joseph T. Collins second Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1974)>
1982 Dewit, C. A. Yield of venom from the Osage Copperhead, Agkistrodon contortrix phaeogaster. Toxicon 20():525-527
1982 Dewit, C. A. Resistance of the Prairie Vole (Microtus ochrogaster) and the Woodrat (Neotoma floridana) in Kansas, to venom of the Osage Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix phaeogaster). Toxicon 20():709-714
1983 Miller, Larry L. Bourbon County field trip well attended and successful. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (54):6-7
1983 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles in Kansas for 1982 . Technical Publication of the State Biological Survey of Kansas 13():9-21
1984 Eshelman, Ralph and Michael Hager. Two Irvingtonian (Medial Pleistocene) vertebrate faunas from northcentral Kansas. Pages 384-404 in Contributions in Quaternary Vertebrate Paleontology: A Volume in Memorial to John E. Guilday. Special Publication Number 8 Special Publication Number 8, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp.
1984 Brown, Kenneth L. Pomona: A plains village variant in eastern Kansas and western Missouri. Dissertation. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 519pp.
1984 Secor, Stephen M. and Charles C. Carpenter. Distribution maps of Oklahoma reptiles. Oklahoma Herpetological Society Special Publication (3):1-57
1984 Collins, Joseph T. New records of fishes, amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1984. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (58):14-20
1985 Capron, Marty B. A Copperhead from Sumner County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (62):11-13
1985 Fitch, Henry S. and Joseph T. Collins. Intergradation of the Osage and Broad-banded Copperheads in Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 88(3-4):135-137
1986 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1986. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (66):9-16
1987 Coleman, Keith. Annual KHS Field Trip held at Atchison State Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (68):5-6
1989 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1989. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (78):16-21
1990 Gloyd, Howard K. and Roger Conant. Snakes of the Agkistrodon complex: A monographic review. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Contributions to Herpetology Number 6, . pp.
1990 Lardie, Richard L. Kansas threatened species and protection of the Gypsum Hills habitat. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (80):14-15
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Results of second Kansas herp count held during April-May 1990. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):10-12
1990 Collins, Joseph T. Maximum size records for Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (81):13-17
1990 Joy, Jack. An additional note on Howard K. Gloyd. Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 25(10):180
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1991 Fitch, Henry S. Reptiles and amphibians of the Kansas ecological reserves. Pages 71-74 in Ecology and Hydrology of Kansas Ecological Reserves and the Baker Wetlands. Multidisciplinary Guidebook 4. Kansas Academy of Science, Lawrence, Kansas. pp.
1991 Collins, Joseph T. New records of amphibians and reptiles in Kansas for 1990. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (83):7-13
1991 Collins, Joseph T. Results of third Kansas herp count held during April-May 1991. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (85):9-13
1991 Collins, Joseph T. Viewpoint: A new taxonomic arrangement for some North American amphibins and reptiles Herpetological Review 22(2):42-43
1992 Ernst, Carl H. Venomous Reptiles of North America. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D. C. pp.
1992 Knight, A., L. D. Densmore III, and E. D. Rael. Molecular systematics of the Agkistrodon complex. Pages 49-69 in Biology of the Pitvipers Selva, Tyler, Texas. pp.
1992 Collins, Joseph T. Results of the fourth Kansas herp count held during April-May 1992. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (89):10-
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
Joseph T. Collins third Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1982)>
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the fifth Kansas herp count held during April-June 1993 . Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (94):7-11
1993 Fitch, Henry S. Relative abundance of snakes in Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 96(3/4):213-224
1994 Fitzgerald, Eve C. and Charles Nilon. Classification of habitats for endangered and threatened species in Wyandotte County, Kansas Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt, Kansas. 98pp.
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. 1994 Field Trip Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (95):3-4
1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (97):5-14
See, 1994 Rundquist, Eric M. Additions and corrections [to the results of the sixth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1994]. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):4.
1994 Riedle, J. Daren. A survey of reptiles and amphibians at Montgomery County State Fishing Lake. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (98):11-13
1994 Dloogatch , Michael A. (Editor) Herpetology 1994 Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 29(12):282-283
Note on the Fitch (1993) paper in the Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Sciences (96(3-4): 213-224) on the abundance.
1995 Holman, J. Alan. Pleistocene Amphibians and Reptiles. Oxford University Press, New York. 243pp.
1995 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the seventh annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1995. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (101):11-17
1995 Rundquist, Eric M. Additional KHS herp counts for 1995. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (102):11-
1995 Parmley, Dennis and J. Alan Holman. Hemphillian (Late Miocene) snakes from Nebraska, with comments on Arikareean through Blancan Snakes of midcontinental North America. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 15(1):79-95
1996 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eighth annual KHS herp counts Held 1 April-31 May 1996. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (104):6-17
1996 Rakestraw, J. Spring herp counts: A Kansas tradition. Reptile & Amphibian Magazine (March-April):75-80
1997 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the ninth annual KHS herp counts held 1 April-31 May 1997. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (108):12-17
1997 Collins, Joseph T. A report on the KHS fall field trip to the Marais des Cygnes wildlife refuges. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (110):2-3
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1998 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. A Key to Amphibians & Reptiles of the Continental United States and Canada. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 131pp.
1998 Gamble, Jerre. Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Hartford, Kansas. 91pp.
1998 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the tenth annual KHS herp counts for 1998, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (112):11-18
1998 Schmidt, Curtis J. Herpetological observations at Cheyenne Bottoms, Barton County, Kansas. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (113):15
1998 Collins, Joseph T. Results of the KHS silver anniversary fall field trip. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (114):6-
1999 Rundquist, Eric M. Kansas Herpetological Society herp counts: A 10 year summary and evaluation. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (115):42962
1999 Taggart, Travis W. Cherokee County fall 1999 herp count. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (117):6
Reported Anaxyrus woodhousii was likely A. fowleri.
2000 Fitch, Henry S. Population structure and biomass of some common snakes in central North America. Scientific Papers of the Natural History Museum University of Kansas (17):1-7
2000 Rundquist, Eric M. Results of the eleventh and twelfth annual KHS herpetofaunal counts for 1999-2000, held 1 April-31 May. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):11-16
2000 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2000 fall field trip. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (122):6-8
2001 Johnson, Richard W. Spatial ecology of the Eastern Coachwhip (Masticophis flagellum flagellum) in and eastern Texas upland community. Thesis. Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas. 54pp.
2001 Kettle, W. Dean, R. H. Hagen, F. deNoyelles, Jr., and E. A. Martinko. The University of Kansas field station and ecological reserves: A half century of research and education. Miscellaneous Publication Number 9. Kansas Biological Survey, Lawrence. 68pp.
2001 Guarisco, Hank. Ode to an ophidion autumn. Kansas Herpetological Society Newsletter (123):19
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2002 Fogell, Daniel D. Occurrence and relative abundance of amphibians and reptiles at Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Homestead National Monument of America, and Pipestone National Monument within the Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network. Interim Report. National Park Service, Washington, D.C.. 6pp.
2002 Fitch, Henry S. and Anna L. Clark. An exceptionally large natural assemblage of female Copperheads (Agkistrodon contortrix). Herpetological Review 33(2):94-95
2003 Fogell, Daniel D. A herpetofaunal inventory of Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Homestead National Monument of America, and Pipestone National Monument within the Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network. National Park Service, Washington, D.C.. 59pp.
This is the version the author submitted to the NPS. Their final publication was modified.
2003 Suleiman, G. Fort Riley herpetofaunal count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (5):11-12
2003 Taggart, Travis W. KHS conducts first systematic road survey. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):11-12
2003 Fitch, Henry S. Reproduction in snakes of the Fitch Natural History Reservation in northeastern Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):21-24
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2003 KHS spring field trip to Wilson County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (6):2-5
2003 Suleiman, Gibran. Fort Riley herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (7):9
2003 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS 2003 fall field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (8):14-15
2003 Fitch, Henry S., Scott Sharp, and Kylee Sharp. Snakes of the University of Kansas biotic succession area. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (8):20-21
2004 Fitch, Henry S. The effect of female size on number of eggs or young in snakes. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (9):11-12
2004 Fitch, Henry S. Food surplus and body size in local populations of snakes. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (10):14-16
2004 Volkmann, Al. Cowley County herp count. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (11):10
2004 Fitch, Henry S. Observations on Osage Copperheads in northeastern Kansas. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (12):20
2004 Dloogatch , Michael A. (Editor) Herpetology 2004 Bulletin of the Chicago Herpetological Society 39(9):175-178
Note on a paper by Greenbaum and Jorgensen (2004. Amphibia-Reptilia 25(2): 165-172) on copperhead prey preferences.
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2006 Wozniak, Edward J., John Wisser, and Michael Schwartz. Venomous adversaries: A reference to snake identification, field safety, and bite-victim first aid for disaster-response personnel deploying into the hurricane-prone regions of North America. Wilderness and Environmental Medicine 17():246 266
2006 Maher, B. W. and Gregory Sievert. Agkistrodon contortrix. Geographic distribution. Herpetological Review 37():496
2006 Wilgers, Dustin J., Eva A. Horne, Brett K. Sandercock, and Allan W. Volkmann. Effects of rangeland management on community dynamics of the herpetofauna of the tallgrass prairie. 62():378-388
2008 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2008 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (25):2-3
2008 Nolting, Ray. Snake hunter finds rattlesnake in Neosho Parsons Sun 1 May 2008():1,8
Article on the venomous snakes of Neosho County, Kansas encountered during the Kansas Herpetological Society 2008 Spring field trip. Specifically, about a Western Massasauga (FHSM 13846) collected near Galesburg.
2009 Murrow, Daniel G. KHS 2009 spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (29):42769
2009 Douglas, Michael E., Marlis R. Douglas, Gordon W. Schuett, and Louis W. Porras. Climate change and evolution of the New World pitviper genus Agkistrodon (Viperidae). Journal of Biogeography 36():1164-1180
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
Joseph T. Collins fourth Kansas herpetology. <Need to get species total and principal differences with previous 'version' (= Collins 1993)>
2010 Rodriguez, Paul J. Translocation of the Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) in Nebraska. Thesis. University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska. 83pp.
2010 Murrow, Daniel G. Kansas Herpetological Society spring field trip. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (33):2-3
2011 Ernst, Carl H. and Evelyn M. Ernst. Venomous Reptiles of the United States, Canada, and Northern Mexico. Volume 1. Heloderma, Micruroides, Micrurus, Pelamis, Agkistrodon, Sistrurus. Johns hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. pp.
2011 McMartin, David C. U. S. Army 2011 Fort Leavenworth Herpetofaunal Survey: 23 April - 09 May 2011. Privately printed, Leavenworth, Kansas. 33pp.
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Spring Field Trip to Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (38):2-4
2011 Houck, Mike. Fort Riley Herpetofaunal Survey for 2011. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (39):9
2012 Rohweder, Megan R. Spatial conservation prioritization of Kansas for terrestrial vertebrates. Thesis. Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas. 151pp.
2012 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada: Second Edition, Revised and Updated. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 152pp.
2013 Sinclair, Tom. A four-day spring snake count across northern Kansas. Collinsorum 2(1/2):9
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Spring Field Trip to Bourbon County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):3
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Fall Field Trip to Atchison County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Spring Field Trip to Schermerhorn Park, Cherokee County. Collinsorum 2(3/4):4
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2013 Fall Field Trip to Butler County State Lake. Collinsorum 2(3/4):6
2013 Mardis, Dexter and Kevin Scott. 2013 Kansas Herpetofaunal Counts. Collinsorum 2(3/4):7
2014 McMartin, D. Chris. Fort Leavenworth Heretofaunal Survey for 2013. Collinsorum 3(1):10
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the 2014 KHS Fall Field Trip to Woodson County. Collinsorum 3(2-4):12
2014 Taggart, Travis W. Recent scientific and standard English name changes effecting the Kansas herpetofauna. Collinsorum 3(2-4):9-10
2014 Burbrink, Frank T. and Timothy J. Guiher. Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 2014():1-22
2015 Mike Houck. 2015 Fort Riley Herpetofaunal Count final report. Collinsorum 4(1):10-11
2015 Burbrink, Frank T. and Timothy J. Guiher. Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 173():505–526
2016 Pittman, Galen L., Henry S. Fitch, and W. Dean Kettle. Vertebrate animals on the Fitch Natural History Reservation (1948-2002) Kansas Biological Survey Report Number 188, Lawrence. 48pp.
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
2016 Taggart, Travis W. Results of the KHS Summer field trip to Caney River, Chautauqua County, Kansas. Collinsorum 5(2-3):4-5
2017 Crother, Brian I. (editor) Scientific and Standard English Names of Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Mexico, with Comments Regarding Confidence in Our Understanding. Eighth edition. Herpetological Circulars (43):1-102
2018 Riedle, Daren. Conservation conversations: The year of the snake. Kansas Wildlife and Parks Magazine (November/December):6
2018 Houck, Mike. Herp Count: Fort Riley Military Installation Collinsorum 7(1):17
2018 Leao, Suelem Muniz, Eric R. Pianka and Nicolás Pelegrin. Is there evidence for population regulation in amphibians and reptiles? Journal of Herpetology 52(1):28-33
2018 Pisani, George R. and J. Daren Riedle. Ontogenetic changes in tail-length and the possible relation to caudal luring in northeast Kansas Copperheads, Agkistrodon contortrix. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science 121(3/4):403-410
2019 Powell, Robert, Joseph T Collins, and Errol D Hooper Jr. Key to the Herpetofauna of the Continental United States and Canada. Third Edition. Univ Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. 192pp.
2020 Daniel, Richard E. and Brian S. Edmond. Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2019. Privately printed, Columbia, Missouri. 86pp.
2020 Riedle, J. Daren. Revisiting Kansas Herpetological Society field trip and Herp Count data: Distributional patterns and trend data of Kansas amphibians and reptiles. Collinsorum 9(1):7-16
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Cherokee County: KHS-2020-02 Collinsorum 9(3):11-12
2021 Taggart, Travis W and Sarah L Taggart. Herp Count: Cherokee County: KHS-2020-03 Collinsorum 9(3):12
2021 Burbrink, Frank and Sara Ruane. Contemporary philosophy and methods for studying speciation and delimiting species. Ichthyology & Herpetology 109(3):874-894
2021 Holding, Matthew L., Jason L. Strickland, Rhett M. Rautsaw, Erich P. Hofmann, Andrew J. Mason, Michael P. Hogan, Gunnar S. Nystrom, Schyler A. Ellsworth, Timothy J. Colston, Miguel Borja, Gamaliel Castaneda-Gaytan, Christoph I. Grunwald , Jason M. Jones, Luciana A. Freitas-de-Sousa, Vincent Louis Viala, Mark J. Margres, Erika Hingst-Zaher, Inacio L. M. Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Ana M. Moura-da-Silvaf, Felipe G. Grazziotin, H. Lisle Gibbs, Darin R. Rokyta, and Christopher L. Parkinson. Phylogenetically diverse diets favor more complex venoms in North American pitvipers. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of the United States of America. 118(17):10
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Travis W. Taggart © 1999-2024 — w/ Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Fort Hays State University