EASTERN MUD TURTLE
Kinosternon subrubrum (Lacepede 1788)
kī-nō-stĭr-nŏn — sŭb-rū-brŭm


Conservation Status:

State: None

Federal: None
NatureServe State: SNA - Not Applicable
NatureServe National: N5 - Secure
NatureServe Global: G5 - Secure
CITES: None

An adult specimen from Okaloosa County, Florida. Image © Suzanne L. Collins, CNAH.

Description:
The Eastern Mud Turtle is relatively small with a carapacelength of 70-125 mm (2.75-4.92 in). Unlike the Eastern Musk Turtle, the plastron is relatively large and has two movable hinges rather than one. The domed, smooth carapace may be brown, olive, yellowish, or black; in juveniles the carapace can have three longitudinal keels. The carapace of adults is often covered with algae. The head and neck are brown with lighter colored stripes and/or mottling.

Distribution:
This species is known from multiple records in Craig County, Oklahoma, within 14 miles of the Kansas border. 
(, Museum Voucher) (, Observation) (, Literature Record)
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  • Occurrence Summary:  
  • 0
    Records 
  • 0
    Museum Vouchers 
  • 0
    Other Observations 
Some county occurrences indicated below may be too imprecise to map above.
County Breakdown: County Name (# occurrences):


Natural History:
The Eastern Mud Turtle inhabits quiet, vegetated, shallow waters with soft substrates.  They do not bask often, but not uncommonly found wandering far from water. They are omnivorous but feeds principally upon insects, mollusks, crustaceans, amphibians, carrion, and occasionally fish. While most foraging is aquatic, they will feed on land. Females annually lay 1-3 clutches, consisting of 1-6 hard-shelled eggs, in well-drained soil often under some sort of cover.

Occurrence Activity:
White dates indicate there is at least a single recorded occurrence on that date. The darker blue a date is, the greater the relative number of observations for that date.
Observation Type: (of recorded types)
Remarks:
It should be looked for in backwater areas of southwest Cherokee, and southern Labette, Montgomery, and Chautauqua counties.

Bibliography:
1766 Linné, Carl von (=Linneaus). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tomus I Laurentii Salvii, Stockholm, Holmiae, Editio duodecima, reformata (12th Edition). 1-532pp.
1974 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (1):283 pp
1977 Iverson, John B. Kinosternon subrubrum. Catalogue of American Amphibians and Reptiles (193):1-4
1978 Conant, Roger and James F. Berry. Turtles of the family Kinosternidae in the Southwestern United States and adjacent Mexico: Identification and distribution. American Museum Novitates (2642):1-18
1982 Collins, Joseph T. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. 2nd edition. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History Public Education Series (8):
1991 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
1993 Collins, Joseph T. and Suzanne L. Collins. Amphibians and Reptiles in Kansas. Third Edition. University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence. 397pp.
1998 Conant, Roger and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. 3rd ed, expanded. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. pp.
2002 Kingsbury, Bruce and Joanna Gibson. Habitat Management Guidelines for Amphibians and Reptiles of the Midwest. Publication of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, Address not given. 152pp.
2006 Taggart, Travis W. Distribution and status of Kansas herpetofauna in need of information. State Wildlife Grant T7. Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Pratt. vii + 106pp.
2010 Collins, Joseph T., Suzanne L. Collins, and Travis W. Taggart. Amphibians, Reptiles, and Turtles of Kansas Eagle Mountain Publishing., Provo, Utah. 400pp.
2011 Taggart, Travis W. Kansas Herpetological Society 2011 spring field trip to beheld in Chautauqua County. Journal of Kansas Herpetology (37):5-7
2013 Taggart, Travis W. KHS 2012 Summer Field Trip to Meade County State Park. Collinsorum 2(3/4):3
2016 Lozar, Robert C. and James D. Westervelt Application of Maxent Multivariate Analysis to Define Reptile Species Distributions and Changes Related to Climate Change. US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, Illinois.. 100pp.
2016 Powell, Robert, Roger Conant, and Joseph T. Collins. Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston. 494pp.
Account Last Updated:
6/20/2018 10:50:09 AM